Youth Firearm?

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by COUNTRYBOY, Aug 8, 2004.

  1. COUNTRYBOY

    COUNTRYBOY 6 pointer

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    Feb 2, 2003
    Butler Co, KY
    Believe I'll stick with the .243. I just hope I'm able to post a picture of her on here this fall with a big buck but any first deer will be a trophy for her.

    A COUNTRYBOY CAN SURVIVE
     
  2. Deer Hunter

    Deer Hunter 10 pointer

    1,256
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    Dec 6, 2003
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    Shogan,

    I am a little confused. I was thinking there would be less recoil if you were to shoot a heavier grain bullet rather a light grain bullet. I am referring to what you said about the 30-30 Winchester. you said if you could find a 85-100 grain bullet in a 30-30 it might have less recoil than a 243. ? Where would one find a 85-100 grain bullet for a 30-30 ?
     
  3. shogan

    shogan Cyber-Hunter

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    Aug 15, 2002
    Central, ky
    I don't know why but more bullet weight = more kick. Less bullet weight, more gun weight, and less muzzle velocity = less kick. That is why the 30-30 in a lighter would have less kick (because they have less muzzle velocity)

    I think! Go check out the tables listed in the link in my post above.

    As I am now reading more of Chucks work we see that a 100 grain 30-30 is sub standard (probably why you cant find them).

    The bigger the bullet diameter, the larger the hole it tends to make in an animal. 6mm/.24 caliber is the minimum bullet diameter recommended for use on big game animals.

    The bullet weight required increases as bullet diameter increases. A good deer bullet for .24-.25 caliber cartridges weighs about 100 grains. For .26 caliber cartridges, a 120-129 grain bullet is about right. For the .27-.28 caliber cartridges, a 130-140 grain bullet is excellent. For .30-.32 caliber cartridges a 150-170 grain bullet works well.
    http://www.chuckhawks.com/first_big_game_rifle.htm

    This guy has many article written. Most of it looks like his basis on accurate information (fact) and not totally on opinion. I enjoy just reading throught them.
     
  4. Deer Hunter

    Deer Hunter 10 pointer

    1,256
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    Dec 6, 2003
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    Shogan,

    Have you ever personally seen a 30-30 in a 85 to 100 grain bullet ?
     
  5. GSP

    GSP 14 Pointer Staff Member

    13,077
    10
    Dec 12, 2001
    Montrose
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"> I don't know why but more bullet weight = more kick. Less bullet weight, more gun weight, and less muzzle velocity = less kick. <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">


    Old man Newton answered this one in his 3rd Law,
    <i>"For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction."</i>The statement means that in every interaction, there is a pair of forces acting on the two interacting objects. The size of the forces on the first object equals the size of the force on the second object.
    Meaning if you put your foot against the house and your shoulder against a compact car, you will have less pressure on your foot when you try shoving the car. Try the same with Mack truck, you will have much more pressure applied to your foot against the house. The same thing applies when you use a light weight bullet vs: a heavy weight. It takes more pressure to get it moving, which gets transfered to your shoulder.
     
  6. GSP

    GSP 14 Pointer Staff Member

    13,077
    10
    Dec 12, 2001
    Montrose
    Cowboy, here is what I've done with several kids (some folks may dis-agree) but it has worked very well and has ended with 100% kill ratio.
    Pick the gun you want to go with, the break-action .243s are great. Find the same gun in a .22 version and let them do all their practice with that. Let them shoot the deer loads at DEER, not targets. Keep their shots down to the 75 yd range.
    Shooting paper, scares and beats heck out of kids arms, they don't like it and they will only develop BAD shooting skills.
    Keep them on a .22 and break out the deer rifle in deer season.
     
  7. shogan

    shogan Cyber-Hunter

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    Aug 15, 2002
    Central, ky
    I think GSP knows what he talking about from experience and offers a good plan.
    Stick with the .243.

    But to answer your question.

    NO, I believe I had a box of 125 by federal 1 time.
    http://webstore.arss.com/wconnect/wc.dll?arsstore~wcstctodyn~&aw_client=outdrsrc&aw_file=classic1.htm


    I'VE SEEN 100 GRAIN IN RELOADING SUPPLIES AND IT ONCE SUGGESTED TO ME THAT ONE COULD BUY THEM.

    HERE IS A LINK TO SOME BUT AGAIN IT LOOKS LIKE FOR THE 30-30 TO BE EFFECTIVE IT NEEDS TO BE IN 150 GRAIN.
    http://www.armorypub.com/Witzel/3030/DCCo_1_100_Pb_FN_SR__Bd_Dmy_ss.jpg
     
  8. deadaim

    deadaim 12 pointer

    6,720
    117
    Dec 12, 2001
    Booger Hollar
    i have my son shoot light loads thru the 243 to start and then finish the day with a couple of 90 grain and then when we hunt use a 90 grain and he never knows any different.

    Stay content in the mundane it gives us energy when the spectacular comes along....
     
  9. switchblade

    switchblade Spike

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    Apr 13, 2004
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    I also really agree with Remington's suggestion about the ear protection. The sound really freaks out my son, who is otherwise so fearless that THAT almost bothers me. He has a .243. Shotgun noise has never bothered him, but he was afraid to shoot the rifle at first and he was 14.
     
  10. deadaim

    deadaim 12 pointer

    6,720
    117
    Dec 12, 2001
    Booger Hollar
    ear protection is a must for sure there ears can be damaged quicker than adults can!!

    Stay content in the mundane it gives us energy when the spectacular comes along....
     
  11. Lil Gsp

    Lil Gsp 6 pointer

    424
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    May 15, 2004
    Lexington
    Yes use ear protection or you will regret it! If you have problems with your child being afraid of shooting a gun do what my dad did he tricked me. I was afraid to shoot a 20 gauge and didnt want to give up the .410 so he gave me a new gun and said it was a .410. So after we went turkey hunting and i got my first turkey i just happened to look at the barrel and realize it was a 20 gauge and now im not afraid of them at all and shoot them a lot especially for dove season! Im 14 now and I use a 7mm-08 for deer season a very nice gun.
     
  12. COUNTRYBOY

    COUNTRYBOY 6 pointer

    478
    0
    Feb 2, 2003
    Butler Co, KY
    Yeah she wears ear protection except when shooting her .22's. Do you guys know any youth models out there. The only one I really know of and am looking at is the H&R Youth Handi-Rifle. It's a single shot with a short stock so it'll fit a youth hunter. If you guys know of any more I'd be glad to know about'em. Thanks.

    A COUNTRYBOY CAN SURVIVE
     
  13. shogan

    shogan Cyber-Hunter

    3,631
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    Aug 15, 2002
    Central, ky
    I think most any make a youth model. i.e. savage etc. Here is 1 in remington

    http://www.auctionarms.com/search/displayitem.cfm?itemnum=5981221

    The break open single shot seems like a good prudent gun for a youth. And with H&R if she ever wants to try a differnt caliber then all she has to do is save up a $125 and vwhaloah.
     
  14. shogan

    shogan Cyber-Hunter

    3,631
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    Aug 15, 2002
    Central, ky
    http://www.kentuckyhunting.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=9969

    there is a .243 for sale in our classifieds, not sure if it's a youth, and may be more money then you want to throw down on the first rifle.
     
  15. COUNTRYBOY

    COUNTRYBOY 6 pointer

    478
    0
    Feb 2, 2003
    Butler Co, KY
    Thanks Shogun. It just so happens I already have that exact same rifle in a .243 that I coyote hunt with but it is too heavy for her and she has to have a gun with a short stock.

    A COUNTRYBOY CAN SURVIVE
     

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