Wanting to replicate the Lexington 4 board fence

Discussion in 'Community Forum' started by EdLongshanks, Mar 30, 2016.

  1. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

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    I'm a general contractor and carpenter by trade. I'm looking to install about 410 linear feet of 4 board fence to look like the gorgeous horse farms in the central portion of our state. The fence will not be used to hold livestock. I have (what I feel) is a pretty good game plan as to how to accomplish this...but I'm looking for some experienced advise. Do's and don't's. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. kymailman98

    kymailman98 10 pointer

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    When you don't have to hold livestock, you can pretty much do whatever you want. My fencing experiences are mostly here on the farm, and the fences I build are designed to keep horses and cows from getting out and going where they aren't wanted. I've helped build a few board fences that were just for looks, and I always ended up thinking I could have improved upon them. Anyway, good luck, just go with your feelings as to what's best for you.
     
  3. Feedman

    Feedman Cyber-Hunter

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    Take a stick an stop by one of the fences on a horse farm. Mark the top of each board on the stick. This will give you the correct spacing. Post are usually 8 feet apart
     
  4. Buford

    Buford 12 pointer

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    The spaces are the width of the board. The posts are on 7'6" centers as you have to allow for slop in 16 ft fence boards. Make sure and properly stagger the boards and them up off the ground for mowing trimming.
     
  5. Buford

    Buford 12 pointer

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    What I cant tell you is how the pros get it to roll exactly right without following the contour so closely that it moves too much. I know they use a string, but they end up with an almost magical roll when done right. If it's too straight vertically it looks dumb. Shuck built most of mine and while not cheap, it is one hell of a fence.
     
  6. Buford

    Buford 12 pointer

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    Do's- Use treated poplar if you only want looks. Use a faceboard that extends below bottom rail. Use the spiral nails.
    Don't- Use oak unless you need super strong, it twists. Don't use 4x4, use faced posts. don't forget to cut the top at an angle to get water off post.
     
  7. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

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    I ordered the material yesterday from a local company and I need to verify the specie of wood. I am using the 6" faced posts. I plan on screwing the fence together with those torque head decking screws. I ordered extra rails to face the posts. I'm planning on using 40 lbs of sac Crete on each post. Good or bad idea? Should I use the entire 80 lbs bag? I believe the auger we are going to use is 8" diameter. My biggest concern is height. Not sure when to dip the post down or keep is level. The ground is fairly flat where the fence will be installed.
     
  8. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

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    ^^^thats my biggest concern I think.
     
  9. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

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    Also, since the fence is only to deter people from pulling a vehicle onto the property (and it will hopefully look pretty sweet) should I place the rails on the outside towards the road? I know that's not the way you would do it to hold horses...but it would probably look better from the road with the rails and post covers facing the road direction.
     
  10. 1wildcatfan

    1wildcatfan 12 pointer

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    pics of my fence (neighborhood was a horse farm). stain, not paint.

    fence1.jpg
    fence2.jpg
    fence3.jpg
     
  11. westkybanded

    westkybanded 12 pointer

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    We maintained a big real board fence on my place as a kid. Posts were all natural cedar and locust (cured) and we never used any concrete in setting them. 8 foot posts, sunk about 2.5 feet deep. Bought all our lumber rough cut from the amish. It'll hold paint a lot longer. Absolutely make sure you stagger your boards because people will climb the fence. We always just used nails, but screws will work too.
     
  12. ukyager

    ukyager 10 pointer

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    Post will rot twice as fast if you use concrete.
     
  13. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

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    That is a concern and I originally planned to choke them in with gravel. A reputable fencing company up this way (same place I'm buying the material) said they set every one of their posts in concrete. I might put a bed of gravel at the bottom of each hole to provide some drainage.
     
  14. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

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  15. ptbrauch

    ptbrauch 12 pointer

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    It looks like in one of those pics, its for sale. Just buy the house with the fence already there and save yourself some time. :highly_amused:
     

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