Trolling Motor

hunt-4-life21

12 pointer
Sep 26, 2007
3,723
Butler Co.
Probably going to buy a livescope while I’m at as well.
Livescope is a game changer. I used to fish private lakes and never really needed it. Over the winter, access changed so I was forced to public lakes. First off, I wasn't a crappie fisherman. I loved to catch them but I was not ready for public pressured lakes. I decided to bite the bullet and get a LS unit in February. The first couple trips were hard. My boat is a 1648 grizzly with an edge troller (older model). I mounted the transducer to the trolling motor and my first trip was when the wind was blowing 15+mph. It's nearly impossible to single jig LS in 10mph winds; muchless 15+. I took 2-3 more trips and got a little better but still didn't really understand how hard it was to align the boat, sit on a fish, pitch to it, etc. We went to Reelfoot lake for a 4 day trip and I took my boat. After 4 days on the lake, I was much more comfortable using it, and the results were starting to show. The spawn was a little slow but post spawn has been amazing. If you combine the use of state brush piles, side/down scan units, and LS, all you have to do is figure out what they want. I bought a perspective mount and it even helped bluegill fishing. Perspective really shows you where the beds are and where they are at. It's highly a underrated feature. Looking back, I'm glad I lost access to private lake fishing because literally watching a 14" crappie pounce on a jig is more fun than shallow water jigging for 2 months out of the year.

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hunt

8 pointer
Sep 29, 2015
998
The Berg
Livescope is a game changer. I used to fish private lakes and never really needed it. Over the winter, access changed so I was forced to public lakes. First off, I wasn't a crappie fisherman. I loved to catch them but I was not ready for public pressured lakes. I decided to bite the bullet and get a LS unit in February. The first couple trips were hard. My boat is a 1648 grizzly with an edge troller (older model). I mounted the transducer to the trolling motor and my first trip was when the wind was blowing 15+mph. It's nearly impossible to single jig LS in 10mph winds; muchless 15+. I took 2-3 more trips and got a little better but still didn't really understand how hard it was to align the boat, sit on a fish, pitch to it, etc. We went to Reelfoot lake for a 4 day trip and I took my boat. After 4 days on the lake, I was much more comfortable using it, and the results were starting to show. The spawn was a little slow but post spawn has been amazing. If you combine the use of state brush piles, side/down scan units, and LS, all you have to do is figure out what they want. I bought a perspective mount and it even helped bluegill fishing. Perspective really shows you where the beds are and where they are at. It's highly a underrated feature. Looking back, I'm glad I lost access to private lake fishing because literally watching a 14" crappie pounce on a jig is more fun than shallow water jigging for 2 months out of the year.

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I have so many questions about LS and hopefully will get some forward facing in the future. I guess what I wonder most is about shallow water. Most places I fish are relatively shallow, and I saw on your pic you were in about 9ft, so do individual fish show up well on a brushpile,etc in that shallow of water? I currently run a Hook with a Tripleshot transducer and although both the side and down imaging isn't as good as say the Mega from Humminbird, it still does relatively well for a budget unit especially in deeper water but the returns in shallow stuff aren't super clear. Lowrance has great 2D sonar and I like the fish reveal feature which is basically an overlay of sonar on the DI and I splitscreen those together to try and take advantage of the 2D to see bottom composition,etc and use the DI to try and see a little clearer pic of what's underneath. I apologize for being long-winded, but I do appreciate the pics,etc. Hopefully I'll be able to upgrade to live in the future. Post up some more shots of interesting cover,fish,etc please, I could talk and learn more about electronics every single day! Thx!
 

hunt-4-life21

12 pointer
Sep 26, 2007
3,723
Butler Co.
I have so many questions about LS and hopefully will get some forward facing in the future. I guess what I wonder most is about shallow water. Most places I fish are relatively shallow, and I saw on your pic you were in about 9ft, so do individual fish show up well on a brushpile,etc in that shallow of water? I currently run a Hook with a Tripleshot transducer and although both the side and down imaging isn't as good as say the Mega from Humminbird, it still does relatively well for a budget unit especially in deeper water but the returns in shallow stuff aren't super clear. Lowrance has great 2D sonar and I like the fish reveal feature which is basically an overlay of sonar on the DI and I splitscreen those together to try and take advantage of the 2D to see bottom composition,etc and use the DI to try and see a little clearer pic of what's underneath. I apologize for being long-winded, but I do appreciate the pics,etc. Hopefully I'll be able to upgrade to live in the future. Post up some more shots of interesting cover,fish,etc please, I could talk and learn more about electronics every single day! Thx!
Shallow water isn't it's strong suit but it can be done, especially with the new update. Before the last update, the "ghost tree" was terrible in depths 9ft and shallower but it's definitely better now. That screen could be better than what you are seeing but I've gotten used to running 15-20ft on my depth and 40ft in front distance. I've learned what a good sized crappie looks like at that depth/range and what smaller fish look like. You can turn the depth to 12ft (general rule of thumb says to keep your screen set 2 ft deeper than your depth) and dial the forward distance back to 20ft or so to pick up detail. In that photo, you could see the fish in that tree top. And it's much easier to see fish when your watching it live than picking them out of a still photo. When you go shallow, you also lose forward range. Garmin says take your depth and times it by 3 for accurate, non-distorted front range. So, in 9ft of water, you can see out to 27ft clearly. If you go more shallow, that forward range gets shorter. At Reelfoot, we caught them in 18 FOW but needed either 2-1/16oz jigs or 1/8oz at a minimum. If the wind wasn't a factor, 1/16oz heads were fine in 15ft and shallower. If wind is a factor, you need more weight to get down faster. For summer bite, I put a 1/8oz egg weight on top with a 1/32oz jig head. You can literally watch the big egg weight fall to the structure, stop it, and watch the jig head pendulum down from the egg weight.
 

hunt

8 pointer
Sep 29, 2015
998
The Berg
Shallow water isn't it's strong suit but it can be done, especially with the new update. Before the last update, the "ghost tree" was terrible in depths 9ft and shallower but it's definitely better now. That screen could be better than what you are seeing but I've gotten used to running 15-20ft on my depth and 40ft in front distance. I've learned what a good sized crappie looks like at that depth/range and what smaller fish look like. You can turn the depth to 12ft (general rule of thumb says to keep your screen set 2 ft deeper than your depth) and dial the forward distance back to 20ft or so to pick up detail. In that photo, you could see the fish in that tree top. And it's much easier to see fish when your watching it live than picking them out of a still photo. When you go shallow, you also lose forward range. Garmin says take your depth and times it by 3 for accurate, non-distorted front range. So, in 9ft of water, you can see out to 27ft clearly. If you go more shallow, that forward range gets shorter. At Reelfoot, we caught them in 18 FOW but needed either 2-1/16oz jigs or 1/8oz at a minimum. If the wind wasn't a factor, 1/16oz heads were fine in 15ft and shallower. If wind is a factor, you need more weight to get down faster. For summer bite, I put a 1/8oz egg weight on top with a 1/32oz jig head. You can literally watch the big egg weight fall to the structure, stop it, and watch the jig head pendulum down from the egg weight.
Thx, I appreciate the detailed reply from first-hand use. As we know, technology will continue to advance, but I'm still leaning to some kind of forward facing in the future. Thx again.
 

hunt

8 pointer
Sep 29, 2015
998
The Berg
Lots of debate going on around different forums on whether or not the crappie population are being negatively affected by LS right now. I think it’s the carp on Kentucky jacking the numbers around.
Will it be the next A-rig of the crappie fishing world? Some tournaments banned the A-rig, who knows....?
 

CRFmxracer

12 pointer
Sep 9, 2010
3,793
louisville kentucky
I would get an ultrex. Personally I cannot stand the ulterra or Terrovas, the pedal is not very responsive like a cable steer would be. Ultrex is electric steer as well but they got it down where it’s not much different than cable steer. The ghost and force and motor guide are nice, but I don’t see the advantage they offer with a higher price tag
 

hunt-4-life21

12 pointer
Sep 26, 2007
3,723
Butler Co.
I don't think you can really understand how many crappie are on structure until you get LS. I thought live sonar would be a bad thing for the crappie population but there are literally hundreds of small crappie on those brush piles. I wished I had taken a picture a few weeks ago but I forgot. Most times, you won't catch the 4-6" crappie because they can't bite the jigs. I could see the argument that live sonar is hurting the big, big fish because you can literally target a single fish. But for every 2lb plus crappie you pull out, there's 10 that you never catch.
 


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