Trip North

Discussion in 'Small Game Hunting' started by Birdman, Jul 17, 2011.

  1. Birdman

    Birdman Cyber-Hunter

    3,669
    1
    Feb 26, 2002
    Paintsville, KY, USA.
    Excellent, all it takes is cutting trees.
     
  2. Bee

    Bee 10 pointer

    1,136
    428
    Mar 14, 2005
    I scroled to Grouse guys video link and watched it. It pretty well sums up , in many ways, my feelings about the grouse populations in SW va, KY. And Tenn. How can youngsters understand grouse hunting with a pointing dog today in Southern Appalachia ? Have to leave the states to find some . Definitely worth watching this video if you sort of want to understand the state of the state of grouse hunting down here now. FWIW Birdman, and I do respect your views< there are enormous areas in Tenn and other parts of Southern App where timber cutting has never stopped and there is a lot of second growth. Birds just are not there in places where they should be . IMO anyway
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  3. Birdman

    Birdman Cyber-Hunter

    3,669
    1
    Feb 26, 2002
    Paintsville, KY, USA.
    Bee, I should have been more specific. Excellent clim. A little sarcastic on the cuttings. We have several areas in Eastern Ky. with great cuts, and no birds. I hope to hunt Tuesday in an area I haven't hunted in several years, hard to get to, good habitat, no hunting pressure, should hold a few birds. I'll let you know what I find.
     
  4. grouseguy

    grouseguy Cyber-Hunter

    Well, I just got back from a week in the northwoods after a 16.5 hour BAD weather travel ordeal. Other than leaving WI in 10" of snow in a whiteout only to make it to Cincy for the ice storm yesterday evening ... the rest of the week was a lot of fun.

    Things I learned:

    1. Grouse RUN ... RUN ... RUN. I can't tell you how many points we had with tracks running away ... point ... tracks ... relocate ... more tracks ... rinse and repeat. All the way till the birds simply ran AWAY without ever flushing. Sure made some sense of all the false points I had this past fall.

    2. Those "good" spots way back in the woods are much easier to access when you can walk "ON" the swamps to get there.

    3. Slipping, tripping, falling on/over things hidden by snow are much harder on 51 year old joints than they are on 35 year olds.

    4. There is something strange/comical about conditions that cause you to sweat enough, that when combined with the cold cause 2" icicles to form on the corners of your cap bill.

    Anyway, there were enough birds that did hold to make it fun and give my 2 year old male a lot of much needed experience. Mostly, I took him on short solo hunts, but we did have one marathon day with Jake Nelson of the Flambeau Forest Inn and his Zeke dog, who is a full older brother to my youngster. That was where the 51 vs. 35 year old comment came from.

    Had lots of fun, food and drink. We even hosted a UK/UL party at the FFI on Saturday complete with a Bloody Mary tasting of Jake's newest concoctions and UK tees and trinkets for gameday pool prizes ... then spent New Years Eve at the FFI with all of our northwoods friends.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  5. Birdman

    Birdman Cyber-Hunter

    3,669
    1
    Feb 26, 2002
    Paintsville, KY, USA.
    They ran on us at times this year and I mean run, looked like rabbits. Sounds like you had a good time. Happy New Year.
     
  6. grouseguy

    grouseguy Cyber-Hunter

    Reminds me of a quick story ... on one of his points, my youngster, Max pointed a very well camoflaged Snowshoe Hare. When we walked in and it tore out, Max first turned and gave me this WTH? look before giving full chase and I let him go 20 or so yards before I hit the button with no notice. He immediately yelped, stopped and ran back to me and I had to explain to him that the big white rabbits were electric!!! ;):cool:
     

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