They want me to pay to hook onto the sewer

Discussion in 'Community Forum' started by rackhanger, Jun 26, 2015.

  1. rackhanger

    rackhanger 6 pointer

    491
    0
    Jul 5, 2012
    N east,
    So today the county comes thru and says they are expanding the sewage line . The feller explains to me that i will be forced to hook up to sewage line that will be installed,quote its the law!! lol.He goes on to explain that my septic tank is junk and is pushing turds above the ground lol!!! Bottom line is this will cost an additional minimum 35 $ per month to have public sewage which is bs! Any opinions on weather or not i have to per take in this bs just because they say its the law? Heaven forbid i fill the environment full of shit lol,what do you think guys? I think they can kiss my ass before they get an easement from me !
     
  2. riverboss

    riverboss 12 pointer

    6,053
    4,584
    Jan 26, 2009
    northern ky
    Sounds like crap to me!
    If you paid for a septic it should be up to code and a done deal. Just more gov intrusion.
     
  3. Fat Tony

    Fat Tony 12 pointer

    Not that uncommon, sadly. Unless you get a variance, they can often force you to tie into the line. Depends on the individual situation. I'd have someone in your neck of the woods have a look at everything.
     
  4. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

    14,614
    12,154
    Nov 16, 2013
    Northern Kentucky
    I would rather be on the public sewer myself, especially if your system is no longer functioning. No idea how they can compel you to tap into the city sewer, assuming your septic is functioning and your lot size is of sufficient size.
     
  5. rackhanger

    rackhanger 6 pointer

    491
    0
    Jul 5, 2012
    N east,
    system i have is working flawless!
     
  6. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

    14,614
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    Nov 16, 2013
    Northern Kentucky
    How big is your lot?
     
  7. rackhanger

    rackhanger 6 pointer

    491
    0
    Jul 5, 2012
    N east,
    big enough to store some crap 1.6 acres!
     
  8. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

    14,614
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    Nov 16, 2013
    Northern Kentucky
    I will obviously defer to fat tony, but I've never heard of such a scenario...of course that means nothing.
     
  9. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

    14,614
    12,154
    Nov 16, 2013
    Northern Kentucky
    I would be not very happy if I had a 1.6 acre lot, with a functioning septic system, and someone told me I HAD to tap the city sewer.
     
  10. Duster

    Duster 12 pointer

    They get some crazy laws on stuff like that. Our place in Indiana was on septic on a acre lot. Had well water when we bought the place. First was city water after they ran the lines, charged a tap on fee. I forget how much. Next they came up with a sewer plan to run lines thruout the town of 600. Sewer plant not even city owned but by one of the steel mills up on the lake. They wanted us to pay a monthly sewage bill even before the lines were ran and then a tap on fee after they were plus the monthly sewage bill. I was at the town meeting and ask why anyone would pay for something they don't even have yet. Best the town board could come up with is we need the money to build the system in advance. I then ask if what I paid before the lines were run and hooked into if the money I had paid would go towards my monthly bill....Got a few strange looks but they said no. We sold out and moved not long after. I don't know how their best laid plans worked out.
     
  11. AteUp

    AteUp 12 pointer

    15,708
    12
    Mar 14, 2004
    Luavul
    It's progress. They can treat and regulate your waste more eco friendly than you can, and they don't have to worry that individuals aren't keeping their systems up to snuff. Sad truth is prolly one day, there will be a subdivision there. Might be a hundred years but they are building the infrastructure.
     
  12. AteUp

    AteUp 12 pointer

    15,708
    12
    Mar 14, 2004
    Luavul
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/earth-talk-septic/

    Dear EarthTalk: What’s better for the local ecology, sewers or septic tanks?
    —T. H., Darien, Conn.

    You probably won’t have much choice as to whether that home you’re thinking of buying is on sewer or septic. Most likely it’s a done deal, unless the neighborhood is presently all on septic but is considering a petition to the town to switch to sewers (in which case you can usually agree to hook up or stay put).

    There are pros and cons to each in regard to the environment. Both types of systems are designed to handle and treat so-called “blackwater” (wastewater from toilets) and “graywater” coming from our sinks, showers, dishwashers and laundry machines. On-site septic and community-wide sewer systems work in similar ways, utilizing micro-organisms to filter out bacteria, viruses and other disease-causing pathogens before releasing the cleansed water back into the environment.

    In general, most people prefer to be on a shared sewer system if they have a choice, as the burden of keeping the system running smoothly falls on the local government, which presumably has the money and expertise to ensure that wastewater is properly treated across the region. Also, in a shared sewer system, wastewater is whisked away to a centralized treatment facility; anyone who has ever experienced a septic system backup on their property can appreciate what a benefit off-site wastewater treatment can be.

    Another advantage to a shared sewer is that such systems are usually built to withstand heavy loads and can better accommodate periods of heavy precipitation or storm surges that might overwhelm smaller, poorly conceived or maintained home-based septic tanks, which are by virtue of their size and the laws of physics more prone to overflow and send contaminants into nearby surface and ground waters.

    Septic systems have their proponents, though, who say that a professionally designed, installed and maintained system should hold up in even the biggest of storms. The University of Minnesota Extension (UMNE), which publishes the useful online “Septic System Owner’s Guide,” says vigilance is key: “The only way to guarantee effective treatment is to have a trained professional ensure adequate unsaturated and suitable soil exists below the soil treatment area to allow for complete wastewater treatment.”

    When homeowners don’t take care of their septic systems properly, though, they can become a nuisance for the surrounding ecosystem. Wastewater that is not properly treated can contaminate surface and groundwater and threaten public health. According to UMNE, improperly treated sewage can be the culprit behind the spread of hepatitis, dysentery and other diseases resulting from pathogens in drinking water, while also compromising the purity of lakes and streams. Additionally, flies and mosquitoes that are attracted to and breed in wet areas where sewage reaches the surface can also spread disease.

    Improperly treated sewage can also lead to increased nitrates in local water supplies, which is dangerous for infants, pregnant women and those with already compromised immune systems. In and around lakes and streams, this influx in nitrates can lead to plant growth out of whack with the local ecosystem’s ability to handle it, resulting in oxygen-free “dead zones” devoid of marine and riparian life altogether.

    see also: Energy & Sustainability: 5 Steps to Feed the World and Sustain the Planet |
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  13. JDMiller

    JDMiller 12 pointer

    10,769
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    Jun 12, 2005
    " Between the Rivers "
    I'm a Ky licensed master plumber .... and to answer the question .... yes... they can make you hook to public sewer when made available. Which beyond local city & county jurisdiction which have their own ordinances or variances ... state plumbing law ... KRS 318 .. is the basis of the enforcement aspect.

    In a nutshell .... the law says you must use public sewer when available as basic principle. If not ... you must have a private sewerage disposal system( septic system in this case) . However the key to the wording here is " use public sewer when available" other words .... a septic system is permissible but as soon as public sewer is available you are required by law to use it.

    Which doesn't matter if your septic system is working properly .. 20 years old or 1 week old ... when public sewer is available to your property / residence the governing municipality can make you hook on. Which they are the governing body here and are the ones who set the tap fees .... rates...ect ...and would be the ones to pursue legal action against the homeowner to make you hook on.

    In most cases ... the tap fees are usually at a lower one time cost in these situations. Even have heard of them providing special financial assistance to homeowners to make the transition. Which other than tap fees.... the transition of cutting loose from the septic and running a new house sewer to the tap will have to be installed to plumbing code and inspected by your local state plumbing inspector. This work can be done by the homeowner which can get a homeowners permit or by a licensed master plumber.

    This part of the work is outside your local municipalities jurisdiction. They can only provide the tap.... they can't legally put in the line from the house to the sewer.

    This is also the same situation concerning city water. If your on a well .. they can make you hook on to city / county water under the same laws.


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  14. smashdn

    smashdn 12 pointer

    9,244
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    Nov 24, 2003
    Palmyra, Kentucky
    They keep chippin' away. I'd sit in my front yard with a .45 in my lap and tell them to start diggin', if your brave enough.
     
  15. JDMiller

    JDMiller 12 pointer

    10,769
    3,828
    Jun 12, 2005
    " Between the Rivers "
    Also ... just throwing this out there concerning easement.

    Which I don't know your situation but if the municipality is city or county they probably already have easement if there's a city or county road bordering your property. It doesn't normally end just with what you see as the road. Most cases it's 15'ft from the center of the road onto properties either side. Sometimes this distance can be much more .

    They (city, county, state) also have the ability to enact "eminent domain" and literally take the easement if necessary.




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