Sawtooth oak question

Discussion in 'Habitat Improvement' started by nateb440, Dec 5, 2013.

  1. nateb440

    nateb440 8 pointer

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    Any of you ever plant sawtooth oak on your farm? It is a non native tree but I picked up a couple for the farm. From what I'm reading, the deer seem to like them and they grow fast. Sounds like a winner. I have only two 3 year old trees now. Thinking about getting more.
     
  2. DRS

    DRS Banned

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    Your Sawtooth Oak is called a Korean Oak, and it is a very good tree to add to your habitat program. I had several growing up where I use to live in Southern Indiana. They are fast growing and will produce acorn in just 20 years, and Deer love them & they are a hardy tree.
     
  3. bigpuddin43

    bigpuddin43 12 pointer

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    A non native that is fast growing and becoming invasive. I prefer a native route why not plant trees that our wildlife have evolved for thousands of years to feed on.
     
  4. TedB

    TedB 10 pointer

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    Did you find them locally or online? I've been planting them grown from acorns for about 3 years. Found some trees a member here turned me onto and plant a few hundred acorns every year. I've got some 3 year old trees that are 6' plus. They are an invasive but if you want to plant trees that produce good results in YOUR lifetime, they are your best choice. I'm using them to replace the ash trees that died off on my place. And sawtooths start producing at 7 years, not 20.
     
  5. scsims

    scsims 10 pointer

    I have some that are 11 years old and not producing yet......not sure why, could be that they were bush hogged down when they were at the at the three year mark. They are now about 12 feet tall. I've had some Burr oak that came up as volunteers in the same field that have had a few acorns on them the last 2 years.
     
  6. nateb440

    nateb440 8 pointer

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    I got them for free from a friend who grew them. I know all about invasives as I just finished cutting and spraying 50 acres of honeysuckle. I can't imagine sawtooth oak being anything like Japanese bush honeysuckle. I do want to see some "fruit" of my labor in my lifetime. Working on soft mast trees and all kinds of oaks and even looking into planting dunstan chestnut and chinese chestnut. The oaks I'm planting are mostly to kickstart the forest regrowth after the honeysuckle slaughter. Thanks for the replies.
     
  7. TedB

    TedB 10 pointer

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    Could be, I'd clear any brush or trees within 20 feet, prune limbs and fertilize them with 10-10-10 around the drip line. Trees have a hard time making a living in fescue fields. I'd spray and mulch and maybe amend the soil at least.

    You're right, lots of people look down on any invasive but there are lots of things we plant and feed deer that don't come from that region or even this country naturally. Personally my land will never be timbered and I could care less about what it's worth. I've seen what 15 year old sawtooths can do and I'll cut down red oaks to plant them.
     
  8. bigpuddin43

    bigpuddin43 12 pointer

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    Remember bush honeysuckle was planted for wildlife habitat as well now look at what we are dealing with. I just hope we don't end up with sawtooth oaks out competing our native oaks. They actually aren't that high on their preferences due to high tanin levels. The reason they do eat them is because they drop early before a lot of other oaks are dropping. I would prefer to leave our children and grand children with better habitat than start an issue they might have to fight their whole lives to correct. Natives are always a better option in my opinion.
     
  9. scsims

    scsims 10 pointer

    The ones I planted were Gobbler Sawtooth Oaks.......just remembered.
     
  10. nateb440

    nateb440 8 pointer

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    Point taken and it is certainly a valid argument. The primary difference is the nature of the plant I guess. Honeysuckle with its millions and billions of little red berries ripening just in time for flocks of migrating robins and such to roll through eating and dumping the extremely shade resistant seeds. Those things will grow on top of a rock or inside a fork in a tree! Vs a tree that takes a lot of right things to happen and years...probably decades or scores of years to ever become established within the area of introduction and be considered invasive. Personally, I agree with your logic, but in my neck of the woods in central kentucky, the war against invasives has been lost save for a few caretakers of the forest like you and me who work hard to rid the forest of true unwanted infestation. On my little 50 acres I'm happy to keep spraying the sprouts of the spawn of satan otherwise known as bush honeysuckle and plant a few non natives to form that perfect hunting plot around my only 2 acres of cleared land. My forest will remain native and beautifully diverse for as long as I and my boys own the land as I've released tons of little chinkapin, shumard, and white oaks to hopefully be producing in 20 to 30 years. Thanks for the responses!
     
  11. smashdn

    smashdn 12 pointer

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    Oaks and kickstart don't really go together. Make sure you plant a mix of varieties of oaks so if some kind of borer or blight or whatever rolls through you don't have a mono stand that will get wiped out.
     
  12. cfd266

    cfd266 8 pointer

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    I did some very quick google research on gobbler Sawtooth oaks and never found anything about them being invasive at all. They might grow quicker than other oak varieties, but they are hardly a problem. They can produce a nut within the first 6 years, but probably won't for about 10 years. The department of forestry sells them to everday consumers like us at a very good price so I see no problem with planting them at all. Like most everyone else has said though, I would plant a variety of oaks along with other trees. Consider some hickory trees. They grow relatively fast and provide good ground cover to keep under growth down. Good luck.
     
  13. skin_dog1

    skin_dog1 BBBC Members

    Check out some of the hybrids mossyoak nativnurseries have. They have some trees that produce as quick as the gobbler sawtooth but are native.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  14. Strutter

    Strutter Cyber-Hunter

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    IIRC the gobbler sawtooth was created by UK at their Quicksand KY tree farm. Also, the KY dept of Forestry sells sawtooth oak seedlings or have the past few years. If they are creating and selling them, they couldn't be that bad for the environment.
     
  15. bigpuddin43

    bigpuddin43 12 pointer

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    Good read notice the part about the acorns offering less nutrition than our native oaks. Gobbler oaks are just a variety of a sawtooth. Same species just a variety that produces a smaller acorn. The reason you are planting it is what could cause this species to hurt our native forests. The fact that it grows quickly and produces fruit much earlier will allow it to out compete our native oaks. It has already naturalized and trees have been found outside planting areas. I just dont believe the instant gratification is worth it. You are planting a possible invasive to get a pourer food source than our natives provide just because you will get acorns a 10 years earlier. Unless you go with a burr oak that could produce in the same amount of time. all of the invasives we battle now were brought in for the same reason you are using these.

    http://www.nps.gov/cue/epmt/products/Quercus acutissima 2012 NCREPMT.pdf
     

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