rare visitors?

Discussion in 'Waterfowl Hunting' started by adam, Mar 12, 2003.

  1. adam

    adam Banned

    515
    0
    Feb 14, 2003
    .....................

    ......................
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2005
  2. Valley Station

    Valley Station Cyber-Hunter

    This spring Kentucky has plenty of water, creating ideal habitat, and probably will hold Northbound migrants a little longer than normal. It seems waterfowl and other migratory birds "slow down" and spend more time in Kentucky on their return trip North than the trip South. Seems like in some years they just blow past us heading South.
    I always see more pintails, canvasbacks, redheads , exotic shore birds in their return North.[:)]
     
  3. Hammer

    Hammer 12 pointer

    3,724
    1
    Sep 2, 2002
    Bowling Green, Ky.
    adam, I had a group of 50 sandhill crane's fly over me at the farm on Monday. I heard them first, and there is absolutely no mistaking their call. They were heading due North. I had the pleasure of killing a few of those things in Texas several years back. Tasted pretty good!
     
  4. edmonson

    edmonson 6 pointer

    107
    0
    Mar 8, 2003
    mammoth cave, ky, USA.
    90 % of our birds around edmonson are mallards, with 9% woodies, and the rest gadwalls, mergansers, and the occational pintail

    Fear Nothing, Hunt everything
     
  5. "widgeon"
    what year at eku are you in again adam? :)
     
  6. Valley Station

    Valley Station Cyber-Hunter

    You "pups", it spelled "Baldpate"![:I][:eek:)]
     
  7. Multidigits

    Multidigits BBBC Members

    17,760
    1
    Dec 10, 2001
    Vine Grove, Ky, USA.
    LOL....Looks like Adam is correct! Do a Google search and WIDGEON comes up as a winery somewhere.....maybe YNOT has been on the berries since he got skipped over for the Dept. job???
     
  8. I guess it depends who taught the class and we are both correct. so no I got it right on the lab practical in Resident/Migratory Class. So how far along are you at eku?

    Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) :

    Widgeon \Widg"eon\, n. [Probably from an old French form of F.
    vigeon, vingeon, gingeon; of uncertain origin; cf. L. vipio,
    -onis, a kind of small crane.] (Zo["o]l.)
    Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially
    those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus
    Anas. The common European widgeon ({Anas penelope) and the
    American widgeon ({A. Americana) are the most important
    species. The latter is called also baldhead, baldpate,
    baldface, baldcrown, smoking duck, wheat, duck, and
    whitebelly.

    Bald-faced, or Green-headed, widgeon, the American
    widgeon.
    Always wondered why I seen it misspelled?:)
     
  9. Multidigits

    Multidigits BBBC Members

    17,760
    1
    Dec 10, 2001
    Vine Grove, Ky, USA.
    Websters-modern day version- Main Entry: wi·geon
    Variant(s): or wid·geon /'wi-j&n/
    Function: noun
    Inflected Form(s): plural wigeon or wigeons or widgeon or widgeons
    Etymology: origin unknown
    Date: 1513
    : any of several freshwater ducks (genus Anas): as a : an Old World duck (Anas penelope) with a large white patch on each wing and in the male with a red brown head and a buff crown b : BALDPATE

    I saw one at Central WMA awhile back.
     
  10. LOL, multi..." I saw one at central wma awhile back"
    so what is the latest word on that issue? last I heard they were mowing it down every year until they hear otherwise. were you the one that talked to a biologist and he said they did it because of all the sumac trees or something like that? just wondering if that is indeed what you still believe? has anyone read the new signs put up there that justify the mowing and the birddog association involvement? adam, can you take a pic of the sign and post it?
     

Share This Page