Processing your own--in the heat

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by kyhunter99, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. kyhunter99

    kyhunter99 10 pointer

    1,468
    718
    Dec 21, 2014
    Ky
    Never had to do this before but--what are your procedures from dressing to packaging for processing your own deer in weather like this?
    (Some people use a modified fridge, some coolers and ice--etc) also any special considerations like
    How long to wait before tracking after a shot,
    Are flies a big issue? Etc
     
  2. Mainbeam

    Mainbeam 12 pointer

    6,863
    2,773
    Jul 7, 2012
    I like to have em cut up within 3 hours of the shot this time of year. Only takes a few minutes to skin and get all the meat off that we like. We take everything off the back and the back straps and if i field dress i get the inner loins. Sons buck the other night we had him caped and all the meat off in the freezer in about 20-25 mins.
     
    barney, Dark Cloud and xilk123 like this.
  3. Munson

    Munson 10 pointer

    1,452
    866
    Dec 24, 2011
    Natural Bridge
    Wear latex gloves, skin, quater bone in overnight in big 120qt cooler. Easier to get silver skin off too when chilled.
     
  4. xilk123

    xilk123 8 pointer

    502
    272
    Oct 7, 2011
    clay co
    Assuming I make a good shot and see the deer go down I will immediately load it up and head out of the woods with it and hopefully have it hanging up within 15 minutes of the shot. From there I will almost always use the gutless method and debone the deer and have it in the air conditioned home of around 70 degrees within another 15-20 minutes. From there I don't get in a big rush just cut it up and package then go into the freezer ever how long it takes. I'll then take the carcass and haul it off this is maybe a hour or so later ever how long it takes to cut and package and then i'll take the liver and heart out of the guts once I get whereever i'm gonna dispose of the carcass. this is a best case scenario of course. I have had a long track and not found the deer for a few hours in 80-90 degrees and the meat has always been fine. Don't get caught up in all the people saying you have 2 hours tops or such nonsense the meat will last imo a good whlie and be perfectly fine, especially if you haven't broken the skin and let bacteria in. I go with gutless method in the heat because once you cut one open it will spoil quicker and you have to fight flies the whole time.
     
    WMAallDAY and bondhu like this.
  5. davers

    davers 12 pointer

    2,459
    674
    Jul 14, 2014
    Kentucky
    After I haul my Deer up to my house, when it's hot or warm weather, I skin it ASAP. Then, I place my venison cuts in a large cooler filled with ice, for a few days. Then trim off fat and the silver skin, wrap and freeze. If it's cold enough, I let it hang in my garage for a few days, then process it.
     
  6. xbokilla

    xbokilla 12 pointer

    8,943
    2,757
    Jun 28, 2012
    We don’t hunt much this early but typically this is our process no matter what. Occasionally gut on the spot but we’ll haul them out near where we park sometimes too. Got a couple of skin trees. Usually use the 4wheeler winch with an old rope I’ve had for years. Used to keep a couple coolers in my truck but bought 1 huge one for this year. We quarter and get in the cooler then whomever has killed one can finish up at home. As long as you change out the ice and rinse still no need in being in a big hurry. Sometimes if our hunt is done for the day, I’ll actually go pick the cooler, etc...up and bring up to a ridge we hunt often and we’ll do it right there.
     
  7. Bubbles

    Bubbles 8 pointer

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    Oct 25, 2016
    Dont trim the silver skin off before freezing. It's an extra layer of protection
     
  8. luvtohunt

    luvtohunt 10 pointer

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    503
    Sep 1, 2011
    Eubank, Ky
    I get mine out as soon as possible. If I see the der go down or hear it crash I almost immediately get down and track. I gut in the field to begin the cooling process and head to the house. Depending on how far away I am I may stop at a gas station and grab a couple bags of ice and shove in the cavity. Usually I'm close early. Hang it as soon as I get home and get the hide off. Even on a 65-70 degree night, it begins to cool pretty rapidly after that. I take my back straps and inner loins off and they go into a big bowl to the fridge. The shoulders go whole in separate bags straight to the deep freeze and the hams too unless I plan to process one out into roasts and steaks. If its a buck, whole hams go in bags and into the freezer to be processed later for ground meat. If its a young doe, I leave the hams on the counter and start processing into the cuts I prefer. I'll throw the carcass in the back of the ranger and deal with it the next day usually.
     
  9. Meatstick

    Meatstick 10 pointer

    1,611
    1,465
    Oct 25, 2013
    Washington County
    Any deer I kill early season, I can get to with the SxS or the truck. I track almost immediately when I know it's a good hit, or see them go down. Load em in the buggy or the truck and head to the barn. Skin and quarter right quick and refrigerate or freeze. From dead deer to in the freezer is usually less than 45 minutes. Sunday morning we worked up 4 in about 90 minutes. Final processing is in the basement at my leisure.
     
    xbokilla and Cornpile like this.
  10. Cornpile

    Cornpile 12 pointer

    5,135
    1,062
    Dec 1, 2006
    Kornfield County,KY
    Get it gutted and hung up,this will reduce body temps. Skin that hide off and go to quartering it up.
    This will also release body heat.If you have a extra fridge,place legs and back straps,extra cut meats into large
    unscented garbage bags. Now, let it chill for two or three days.
    Then start to remove as much as you feel like cutting,trimming and packing for freezer.Doesnt have to all be done at once.
    Try to have it all out of fridge in five days or less and in the deep freeze.
     
  11. dirtstalker

    dirtstalker 10 pointer

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    672
    Nov 20, 2009
    Clay County
    For you all that are putting meat into freezer for later processing...dont the meat thaw back out and then get refroze?
     
  12. bondhu

    bondhu 12 pointer

    2,911
    2,102
    Jul 3, 2015
    Battle Run
    Early season find hopefully load,hang, and skin, debone outer meat put in a meat tub with a rack for circulation in fridge in a couple hours . Back to carcass haul of cut inner loin and heart in ziplock bag done. Will process deer along 7-10 days. It consist of clean and trim meat on wax paper on sheet pan in freezer for time set 1.30 to 2 hours. Firm meat is Vacuumed sealed tight at the end of time and into freezer. Heart and Tenderloin dont make the cut for freezer their just ate.
    Not to worried over deer spoiling I am more concerned about that dove I shot at 2 pm and now were cleaning them at 6 :eek::eek::eek:
     
  13. Nock

    Nock 12 pointer

    5,165
    2,798
    Sep 9, 2012
    butler co
    I don’t get in no mad rush. Deer no different than a dove or squirrel.
     
    KYBOY, xbokilla, Mainbeam and 2 others like this.
  14. WildmanWilson

    WildmanWilson 12 pointer

    9,672
    1,923
    Dec 26, 2004
    Western Ky.
    Animals are killed in Africa all the time in heat so it’s not anything new. My only worry is not finding the animal fast enough. If you let one set overnight it’s ruined. A few hours is fine. I have a fridge I try to get it in as soon as I can but for the most part I don’t hunt much extreme heat.
     
  15. Iceman35

    Iceman35 12 pointer

    7,660
    2,459
    Oct 27, 2008
    Boone County
    I don’t worry in the slightest about the heat. I wait to track and then field dress the same as I would in December. Meat simply does not spoil that fast. After loading in my truck, it’s about 20 minutes to my processors walk in cooler.
     
    Stevens likes this.

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