Processing ur own deer

jtgrin2

6 pointer
Oct 14, 2009
169
I'm a rookie to processing. My friend gut shot a buck about 5 yesterday. He called me to track. We found it about 8 and gutted it on be spot. I may have made some mistakes: didnt wash out the cavity before I hung the deer and didnt fill it with Ice. Just got done eating lunch gonna try to debone it in about an hour. What's everyone's thoughts on how long and at what temp deer meat is good for/at? Should u wash a gut shot deer cavity out? It was around 55 degrees when we found deer that had been laying for 3 hours not sure when it died. Now the temp is gonna get up to around 45 as I'm cutting it up. Just wanna hear thoughts and opinions. Thanks!
 

just me

12 pointer
Sep 26, 2013
2,833
It should be fine but I personally wouldnt use any of the rib meat or the tenderloins on the inside.
 

Lady Hunter

12 pointer
Jan 12, 2009
4,848
If anything looks off color (stomach acids will do that to any meat it touches), don't eat it!
 

chrispbrown27

8 pointer
Nov 2, 2011
571
Carlisle county, KY
Generally 40's is ok to let em hang without ice but of course colder is preferred. I wouldn't be that concerned about the tenderloins unless there is an odd odor. I would suggest in the future if it is a gut shot to rinse it out well.
 

itstherush

6 pointer
Sep 19, 2010
308
Grayson co
I read an article that stated the ageing process of process is more important than the age and sex of the animal itself. The article went on the state that a whitetail can age properly up to 54 degrees. Im not a believer but the article had some valid points. I assume they were right. I always rinse the cavity If its cool (40-48)i dont worry about iceing the cavity. The ice usually only penetrates the cavity which only has the backstraps im interested in. I had a buddy kill a buck on late archery and let it age for 38 days (many years ago.). You could eat it with a fork. Regardless of the cut direction or type of meat.
 

chrispbrown27

8 pointer
Nov 2, 2011
571
Carlisle county, KY
Anything in the 50's makes me nervous, but I have let it go for half a day in those temps. I have always read that aging makes a big difference but I just can't bring myself to take the chance. Someday maybe when I have a walk-in cooler...
 

JDMiller

12 pointer
Jun 12, 2005
10,801
" Between the Rivers "
Most commercial refrigeration coolers or your own refrigerator at home keeps food from perishing around 38-45 degrees. Same holds true for the deer were handling if the outdoor air temps are in that range concerning leaving one hanging.

When it's above 50...60.. 70+ then common sense should apply to the conditions to promote cooling and the urgency to get it done.

After recovery / field dressing / removing from field ... snatch the hide off , quarter at minimum and get on ice.

I like to keep the meat on ice for a few days. I keep adding ice and draining the water off... until there's practically no blood tinge to the water I'm draining. Which saying this.... I want to reiterate the draining and adding ice process. I don't want the meat soaking in ice water as such... I'm doing this several times daily to avoid it and surrounding the meat is just ice. Only what's melted in the bottom of the cooler is being drained.

I've been doing this for several years now and in my opinion changes the taste of the meat drastically. Not nearly as gamey tasting in my opinion.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

davers

12 pointer
Jul 14, 2014
5,090
Kentucky
I'm a rookie to processing. My friend gut shot a buck about 5 yesterday. He called me to track. We found it about 8 and gutted it on be spot. I may have made some mistakes: didnt wash out the cavity before I hung the deer and didnt fill it with Ice. Just got done eating lunch gonna try to debone it in about an hour. What's everyone's thoughts on how long and at what temp deer meat is good for/at? Should u wash a gut shot deer cavity out? It was around 55 degrees when we found deer that had been laying for 3 hours not sure when it died. Now the temp is gonna get up to around 45 as I'm cutting it up. Just wanna hear thoughts and opinions. Thanks!

Since it was "gut-shot" and not washed out; most likely it will be a bit gamey. Might want to soak the cuts in a weak solution of salt water which might help take away the gamey flavor.
 

keith meador

Got the Spotted Fever
Sep 18, 2003
12,072
Grindstone Branch, KY, USA.
Most commercial refrigeration coolers or your own refrigerator at home keeps food from perishing around 38-45 degrees. Same holds true for the deer were handling if the outdoor air temps are in that range concerning leaving one hanging.

When it's above 50...60.. 70+ then common sense should apply to the conditions to promote cooling and the urgency to get it done.

After recovery / field dressing / removing from field ... snatch the hide off , quarter at minimum and get on ice.

I like to keep the meat on ice for a few days. I keep adding ice and draining the water off... until there's practically no blood tinge to the water I'm draining. Which saying this.... I want to reiterate the draining and adding ice process. I don't want the meat soaking in ice water as such... I'm doing this several times daily to avoid it and surrounding the meat is just ice. Only what's melted in the bottom of the cooler is being drained.

I've been doing this for several years now and in my opinion changes the taste of the meat drastically. Not nearly as gamey tasting in my opinion.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I do the same, JD. A few years ago, I took it one step further, I quarter and put the meat in gallon zip-locks to keep the meat dry.
 

KY Swamp Beagler

12 pointer
Feb 20, 2011
3,825
the swamps of western KY
I do the same, JD. A few years ago, I took it one step further, I quarter and put the meat in gallon zip-locks to keep the meat dry.

I put my meat in a 55 gal drum liner because the bags are thicker. Then I put ice in the bottom of the cooler, set the meat in the bag in and then layer ice over the top. I periodically drain the water out so it's not so dang heavy to move. I don't like putting the meat directly in the cooler because of the cooler cleanup later.
 

JDMiller

12 pointer
Jun 12, 2005
10,801
" Between the Rivers "
I do the same, JD. A few years ago, I took it one step further, I quarter and put the meat in gallon zip-locks to keep the meat dry.

That's a pretty good idea...and may have to try that.

Guess too ...seems sort of funny with this thread... but with the buck I killed last Saturday it was the first time I hadn't processed my own in probably 15+ years.

I dropped this one off at an amish processor in Fairview to primarily have him work it up in summer sausage and a few other specialties they do. I told him to save me the tenderloins / backstrap and use everything else as needed.

Which they called me today and said it was ready to pick up..... imagine that's going to tear my billfold a new one but this was under my wifes orders. They make really good stuff and she wants to give a few of the sticks of summer sausage away as gifts.

No way was I going to argue with that logic.
 

KY Swamp Beagler

12 pointer
Feb 20, 2011
3,825
the swamps of western KY
That's a pretty good idea...and may have to try that.

Guess too ...seems sort of funny with this thread... but with the buck I killed last Saturday it was the first time I hadn't processed my own in probably 15+ years.

I dropped this one off at an amish processor in Fairview to primarily have him work it up in summer sausage and a few other specialties they do. I told him to save me the tenderloins / backstrap and use everything else as needed.

Which they called me today and said it was ready to pick up..... imagine that's going to tear my billfold a new one but this was under my wifes orders. They make really good stuff and she wants to give a few of the sticks of summer sausage away as gifts.

No way was I going to argue with that logic.

What I had worked up in sausage tore me a new one. I'm giving rolls away as gifts as well. I think it's a great away to allow nonhunters to experience wild game. I put a roll in the fridge at work. Surprisingly people were really appreciative.
 

riverboss

12 pointer
Jan 26, 2009
7,769
northern ky
Makeing summer sausage is easy i always thought it was hard till i tried it! I like adding sharp cheddar cheese to it, man its good. Ive got 2 bonus tags to fill and both will be summer sausage.
 


Top