Old wood stove - would it be safe to use or ????

Discussion in 'Community Forum' started by Lady Hunter, Jan 12, 2021.

  1. muddhunter

    muddhunter 12 pointer

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    You either know or your about to find out. The stove pipe is high as hell. Not sure how much you will need but the triple wall just to get it from stove to outside will be a kick in the pants. Depending on how close you run it to the exterior wall may have to continue on up past roofline. Just running it past roof isn’t good enough. There are formulas for how high the termination cap must be based on roof pitch and peak of roof. If you don’t adhere somewhat to the formula you will end up having drafting issues and Smokey fires in the basement. You also need to see if you can extend it far enough from exterior wall that you miss your eve. Or you may go through it but that is extra bucks on the wall thimble and stove pipe. I would say to get a pro to give it a look but most won’t touch it if it’s not new or bought from them. If you were heating a detached barn or garage I would say go for it a d see how it does. But because it is your home I recommend proceeding with caution. The stove itself I wouldn’t worry about after fixing the crack. It’s the expense of stovepipe gives me pause.
     
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  2. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    Thank you.
     
  3. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    Nope! That is what I properly utilized. Besides, it would simply cost more to properly repair after the fact and may not then be possible.
     
  4. Lady Hunter

    Lady Hunter 12 pointer

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    Carlisle as in North Central - not too far from Paris from what I remember. The house was out in the far end of nowhere (the name Soper Road is coming to mind but I'm not sure if that's correct) & needed serious renovation just to stay standing. It was in pretty bad shape and the new owners were more interested in the land (it was on about 40 acres) & building a new McMansion than in essentially rebuilding an old farm house. SIL only lived there a couple of years before two separate marriages went kaput & the first ex (who was on the mortgage) made her sell it. Wish I had pics of it - it would have been beautiful restored.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021
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  5. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    I purchased that product from a specialty place in Atlanta. All the place does is specialize in fireplace installation and repairs. I spoke with them for a great length of time about my fireplace situation one cold winter. They properly advised me that the product would merely buy me some quick use of the fireplace, before the fire's heat would destroy the repair. Such was my primary interest at that time, being that I was in the midst of much remodel and repair (vacant for one decade), and they were correct. I had spoken with the fire chief at the local department, as well, whom referred me to the inspector, and I also spoke with three firefighters within my own family, one of whom has a steel fabrication company. No fire problem did I incur, but such was probably only due to my close observation of all and pyro background, lol. Regardless, I would have never even considered doing such to that pretty wood burning stove in which she has inherited.
     
  6. Lady Hunter

    Lady Hunter 12 pointer

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    I'm not too good at calling overseas (Denmark)... much less able to speak Danish! They've deleted all info for the 1bo from their website - I can't even find the original installation manual. But as best I can tell, these were produced up until the mid-1970's before being replaced by model 2b0.
     
  7. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    Will see what I can find for you. Surely they have a toll free number and english speakers. They will want clear, detailed photos from all angles, including underside, and especially the damage. Try to locate manufacturing stamps.
     
  8. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    This is merely to locate a Morso dealer, but they can likely provide you with the number.

    Toll free number: +1 800 949 4328.
     
  9. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    Okay. Called that 800 number. They are in Spokane, WA....:rolleyes:

    That stove became unavailable to purchase and/or install as of last year, being that it is no longer compliant with EPA regulations (not 2020 approved...non-catalytic). They say that they could not even legally obtain nor sell parts for it after 5/15/20 and had to sell off all before then. How that place previously posted may possibly be doing so would be a bit sketchy, federally, being that federal fines exist. If you had managed to install it prior to that date, you would have been good to go, without risk of fine. Being federal, that fine is probably a bit steep. Regs could always change in the future; so, I personally would not write it off as obsolete, converting it into a planter in the meantime...
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021
  10. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    Or, possibly it could be modified to compliance standards, just a thought.
     
  11. barney

    barney 12 pointer

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    Most everyone had some sort of potbelly stove in the house for heat when I was a kid. About all of them would have a crack somewhere that you could see the far through.
     
  12. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    Found this out on EPA..., simply out of curiosity regarding potential modification:

    "What is the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic wood stoves?

    Some wood-burning stoves make it easier burn fuel by using a chemical process which decreases the formation of pollutants. This process is called catalytic combustion. A wood stove catalytic combustor is comparable to a catalytic converter in a car. Inside the stove, the smoky exhaust passes through a coated honeycomb (the catalyst). The device is chemically coated with a metal that reacts with smoke and other combustion byproducts. These byproducts then generally burn at around 500 degrees, much lower than a non-catalytic stove, which needs a temperature of 1100 degrees. This allows users to burn cleaner at low burn rates, resulting in less wood consumption and overall higher efficiency. Efficiencies average around 78% (with a range of 63- 84%) using the higher heating of fuel (HHV).

    Note that a catalyst stove burns more cleanly at lower burn rates. At high burn rates the particulate matter passes through the catalyst more quickly, with less retention time, resulting in higher emissions.

    Catalytic stoves are typically more expensive long term than non-catalytic models because the catalyst honeycomb eventually breaks down and needs to be replaced. Modern catalysts can last up to 10 years with proper maintenance and use.

    [​IMG]
    Cross-section of
    catalytic wood stove
    Courtesy of Blaze King

    Non-catalytic or secondary combustion stoves make up about 80% of the market. They tend to be less expensive and have an average efficiency of 71% (with a range of 60-80%). Modern model design improvements like firebox insulation, a large baffle to produce a longer hotter gas flow path, and pre-heated combustion air which comes through small holes above the fuel in the firebox create lower emissions. The actual fire and the flames are generally more visible compared to a catalytic stove. Non-catalytic stoves are simpler to operate, and don’t require catalyst maintenance or cleaning.

    A hybrid unit has both a catalyst and secondary combustion, so emissions are reduced from both low and high burns. Some hybrid stove manufacturers allow you to choose which technology you want to use (i.e., secondary combustion, the catalyst or both) at any given time. For example, if homeowners want to maximize heat output and don’t need to see the fire, they can set the stove to catalyst use only. If they want both heat and a view of the fire, they can choose the secondary combustion technology. "

    Intentionally providing no link...
     
  13. JR in KY

    JR in KY 12 pointer

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    Yep I used to pull straws out of the Broom and stick in that Crack! Didn't go over very well, my Dad was scared to death of Fire.
     
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  14. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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