native warm season grass

Discussion in 'Small Game Hunting' started by perrymax, Jun 7, 2002.

  1. perrymax

    perrymax 10 pointer

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    Jun 6, 2002
    Bullitt Co, Ky.
    I've planted 15 acres of nwsg on my farm with help from HIP and WHIP.Does anybody know anything about nwsg,and have you had any luck with it?I started 3 years ago with 10 acres.Last year it was 6 feet tall.Rabbits are everywhere,but I still haven't seen or heard the first quail.I planted big bluestem,little bluestem,indiangrass,sideoats gramma and a small amount of switchgrass.This spring a planted 5 more acres and added Illinious bundleflower,partridge pea and various wildflowers.
     
  2. rlb165

    rlb165 12 pointer

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    Perrymax, I planted 1 1/2 acres of Big and Little Bluestem and Indian Grass in '99. I've had some some sprigs of the Big Bluestem that I can't reach the seed-heads on.

    Last year, I was in the middle of it, spraying thistles. I saw something at my feet which I first thought was mice. Turns out it was baby quail. That was pretty cool. I see a few quail every now and then, and rabbits every so often.

    I had planned on planting some more of it, but at this point I don't think I will, though I do think it could benefit a lot of people in different situations.

    Good Luck,

    Richard
     
  3. KYhunter

    KYhunter Cyber-Hunter

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    peerymax. Around each plot disc up a strip or two at the edge, esp nearest fencreow or woods. Quail really need sone bare dirt to run around on, and is easier for the young to move about. Is a good spot for bugs, ants, insects, etc.
     
  4. Darton73

    Darton73 6 pointer

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    Hey Perrymax,

    I've planted lots of NWSG over the last 3 years. What exactly are you wanting to know? It is great habitat for small game, as well as deer and turkey, but if you don't have any quail in the area to start with, then even the best habitat won't make them magically appear. To go along with what KYHunter said, we are having really good luck with planting a 20ft strip of clover around our NWSG fields. It provides an excellent bugging area, open ground, and a good fire break when you are ready to burn your stand. I'll be glad to try and answer any other questions you have about it.



    Brian Grossman
    [email protected]
     
  5. perrymax

    perrymax 10 pointer

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    Jun 6, 2002
    Bullitt Co, Ky.
    I'd like to know what to expect down the road.How hard will it be to keep the fescue out?Which grasses did best in Ky,particularly hillsides in Ky?What about cutting it for hay?
     
  6. Darton73

    Darton73 6 pointer

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    Dec 9, 2001
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    Hey Perrymax,

    All the warm season grasses I have planted have been the mix that rlb165 mentioned - Big Blue, Little Blue and Indian Grass. We have had some moderate problems with fescue creeping back into fields - mainly ones that never reached full potential to begin with. Once you have a good stand established, it is fairly low maintenance. It is a good idea to burn a stand every 3-5 years to remove the dead "trash" that can block small game travel as well as return nutrients to the soil and stimulate seed growth of NWSG.

    If you click on "Home" up at the top of the page, then click on "Habitat Info" on the home page, there is a very informative Habitat How-To article on NWSG provided by the Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife Resources.



    Brian Grossman
    [email protected]
     
  7. rlb165

    rlb165 12 pointer

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    Perrymax, I got some pretty good info. from our County Extension Agent about NWSG's.

    As far as cutting for hay, one advantage of NWSG's is they are typically cut later in the season than cool season grasses, which helps the baby critters.

    I remember seeing some kind of chart showing hay production for NWSG's, it compared very favorably to cool season grasses.

    On the downside (for my area anyway), the thing about having bare spots for quail and stuff to move around. Around here, a lot of people seem to have given up on controlling thistles. Sometimes if the wind is right, it looks kinda like it's snowing when the thistle seeds are blowing around. It seems like if I have any bare spots at all, thistles will sprout there. What makes it tough, once the thistles get tall enough to be seen in the tall grass and stuff, 2,4D won't kill them.
     
  8. Multidigits

    Multidigits BBBC Members

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    Dec 10, 2001
    Vine Grove, Ky, USA.
    RLB--I saw in the newspaper a while back that there is an old law still on the books that your required to kill thistles on your property. I chopped out several hundred of them last week while working on my sawtooth oak trees. I don't want the thistle police coming down on me.
     

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