Mushroom Identification

Discussion in 'General Hunting' started by Kyhilltrapper, Nov 5, 2019.

  1. Kyhilltrapper

    Kyhilltrapper Fawn

    3
    1
    Aug 31, 2019
    The hills
    I have never found this mushroom before and came across one today while deer scouting. Does anyone know what this is? Thank you in advance for any help.

    56A5E5E9-56A8-4982-9B84-5B9BBB55F1E9.jpeg
    59371FC8-CF4B-481D-AE27-DBAF83C9E44F.jpeg
    4A71306D-5B17-4EB4-B365-6D0CE03F8DB8.jpeg
    AC8750C4-2771-4AAF-86BB-9878960C1305.jpeg
     
  2. Mt Pokt

    Mt Pokt Spike

    63
    38
    Nov 8, 2018
    Campbell County
    Looks like a chicken to me, but I'm no expert by any stretch of the imagination.
     
  3. Gforcetrivers

    Gforcetrivers 10 pointer

    1,240
    1,101
    Sep 23, 2016
    Burkesville
    Looks like Laetiporus Cincinnatus aka Chicken of the Woods choice edible but those are well past prime. There is another one Sulphureus also edible.
     
  4. carnivore

    carnivore 12 pointer

    5,499
    3,595
    Nov 17, 2007
    Ky
    Check that spot next year !!! And use those to put spores on other trees
     
    Gforcetrivers and FOWLER2671 like this.
  5. Gforcetrivers

    Gforcetrivers 10 pointer

    1,240
    1,101
    Sep 23, 2016
    Burkesville
    What he said!
     
  6. FOWLER2671

    FOWLER2671 12 pointer

    2,945
    515
    Sep 11, 2009
    Evicted from Aintry'
    I guess I show up a day late and a dollar short.... I have taken to picking mushrooms that I find and bring them home to ID....

    On mushrooms like that that turn woody or tough, Has anyone tried adding them to soups etc to tenderize them?
     
  7. FOWLER2671

    FOWLER2671 12 pointer

    2,945
    515
    Sep 11, 2009
    Evicted from Aintry'
    Great idea!!
     
  8. Bee

    Bee 10 pointer

    1,002
    225
    Mar 14, 2005
    Chicken and Hen both can be tough in texture if not picked in their youth. The restaurant chefs I deal with from time to time often take large batches, roast them lightly, , and work them in to small chunks or grit sized media. freeze them, and then they use it in many dishes soups etc
     
    FOWLER2671 and barney like this.
  9. Kyhilltrapper

    Kyhilltrapper Fawn

    3
    1
    Aug 31, 2019
    The hills
    Thanks everyone for the help. I thought that’s what it was but just wanted to make sure, it’s a good thing to have knowledgeable folks that are willing to help someone.

    How do you recommend I spread the spores? Should I spread spores on the trees in the general area or could I spread them somewhere else? When should I start to look for them next year? I am in the hills a lot and this is the first time to my knowledge that I ever seen one. I got kinda excited to be honest.

    Thanks again.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2019 at 9:54 AM
    Carl likes this.
  10. carnivore

    carnivore 12 pointer

    5,499
    3,595
    Nov 17, 2007
    Ky
    Id rub them on dead or dying oaks and ash trees. DO NOT eat chicken growing on pine or cedar trees. Im not sure if they prefer a certain side (north vs south) of the tree or not.
     
    kyoutdoorsman likes this.
  11. Bee

    Bee 10 pointer

    1,002
    225
    Mar 14, 2005
    Again, to restate the obvious but it cannot be overstated....And Every mushroom thread should restate cardinal rule: if you are not sure exactly of exact Identification of the in hand mushroom then DO NOT eat it.
     

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