Last WWII Marine flying ace dies at 100, served in 110 combat missions

KYote-Krusher

12 pointer
Jan 12, 2006
3,692
South Central Kentucky

Last WWII Marine flying ace dies at 100, served in 110 combat missions​


WOW!! Look at that combat time and list of medals!

  • A Silver Star
  • 2 Distinguished Flying Crosses with 3 gold stars
  • An Air Medal with 4 gold stars
  • A Congressional Gold Medal
I just went to ABE books to see if I could buy one of his books and there are 3 on there for $80.00 each. Soooo ... I went to eBay and found just one of his for $10.00 and .... sorry gang ... I bought it!
The title is, "Kamikaze Madness", can't wait to get it.

What a man! May he rest in peace, he surely deserves it.
 

KYote-Krusher

12 pointer
Jan 12, 2006
3,692
South Central Kentucky
As I said above, I bought one of the books written by Dean Caswell, "Kamikaze Madness" on eBay and was bowled over to find that he had actually signed it twice on the inside cover. Whoever sold it didn't mention that little fact.

But the real surprise was the book itself, I learned more about the War in the Pacific than I'd even had a clue about, through his descriptions of the actual battles which he participated in, leading up to the invasion of the Japanese homeland.

We have no idea how hard our Soldiers, Navy and Airmen fought to keep this Country Free; the sacrifices, the willpower and the perseverance under overwhelming pressure that they endured are generally ignored by those who have no understanding of how we got here and in most cases could care less.

The Japanese people were raised from childhood to believe that giving their lives for their Emperor and Country was the only natural and honorable way to live their lives. In the end, they were sending up 17 year old Kamikaze pilots who were only trained to take off and fly behind a "leader" to whatever their target might be. Our airmen fought an exhausting and almost constant battle to keep our carriers safe and support the ground troops as they fought for every single inch of the enemy held islands leading to mainland Japan.

I wish everyone could read that book, it's not just Dean Caswell but excerpts from the diaries of many other Marine and Navy pilots who told it like it was.

We owe them all a debt of gratitude that can never, ever, be repaid.
 

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KYote-Krusher

12 pointer
Jan 12, 2006
3,692
South Central Kentucky
Those of you who are interested in reading the book would be welcome to but, even though I think it's a treasure, I've already given it to a friend with the promise that he'd do the same. It really is the kind of thing that every American needs to read.

Dean Caswell did write a few more and if I can get one reasonably priced, I will.

Here's what this one looks like if you're interested, hope you can find a copy.
 

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EC

12 pointer
Jul 13, 2003
12,544
Louisville, KY.
As I said above, I bought one of the books written by Dean Caswell, "Kamikaze Madness" on eBay and was bowled over to find that he had actually signed it twice on the inside cover. Whoever sold it didn't mention that little fact.

But the real surprise was the book itself, I learned more about the War in the Pacific than I'd even had a clue about, through his descriptions of the actual battles which he participated in, leading up to the invasion of the Japanese homeland.

We have no idea how hard our Soldiers, Navy and Airmen fought to keep this Country Free; the sacrifices, the willpower and the perseverance under overwhelming pressure that they endured are generally ignored by those who have no understanding of how we got here and in most cases could care less.

The Japanese people were raised from childhood to believe that giving their lives for their Emperor and Country was the only natural and honorable way to live their lives. In the end, they were sending up 17 year old Kamikaze pilots who were only trained to take off and fly behind a "leader" to whatever their target might be. Our airmen fought an exhausting and almost constant battle to keep our carriers safe and support the ground troops as they fought for every single inch of the enemy held islands leading to mainland Japan.

I wish everyone could read that book, it's not just Dean Caswell but excerpts from the diaries of many other Marine and Navy pilots who told it like it was.

We owe them all a debt of gratitude that can never, ever, be repaid.
My uncle died around 1970. He was in the Army and went in at Saipan, Okinawa, Philippines, etc. when he died, my dad said to me…the war killed him.
 


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