Landlocked hunting ground

slickhead slayer

12 pointer
Nov 14, 2005
6,701
VP OF ADMIN Development
By Ky law every property is allowed access. The problem arrives with properties that don't have deeded access for a multitude of reasons. Mostly due to bordering landowners buying a tract that borders them, that was broken up, and they didn't need the existing easements since they had their own access.
That being said, HOW you retain your easement is the answer to your question. It can be anywhere from fairly easy to extremely complicated. Your attorney fee will represent the difficulty of obtaining it. Get an attorney to pull the deed and it's history. He will be able to tell you the difficulty with minimal research.

Edit: looks like you posted while I was typing. A local attorney researching it is exactly the correct procedure. Looks like you are already doing that.
 

ManofManyStangs

8 pointer
May 4, 2009
588
By Ky law every property is allowed access. The problem arrives with properties that don't have deeded access for a multitude of reasons. Mostly due to bordering landowners buying a tract that borders them, that was broken up, and they didn't need the existing easements since they had their own access.
That being said, HOW you retain your easement is the answer to your question. It can be anywhere from fairly easy to extremely complicated. Your attorney fee will represent the difficulty of obtaining it. Get an attorney to pull the deed and it's history. He will be able to tell you the difficulty with minimal research.

Edit: looks like you posted while I was typing. A local attorney researching it is exactly the correct procedure. Looks like you are already doing that.

I went and pulled deeds back to 1975 today no mention of access.
 

Ezelkyhunter

10 pointer
Nov 28, 2013
1,425
There is an easement be it deeded or otherwise. There are multiple types of easements (some recorded some not). Hopefully the attorney can figure it out pretty quick.
 
Mar 4, 2018
359
Beattyville
I have to cross another guys property that gave me permission to cross, but he is trying to sale it as well. Way over priced though for my use.
I don’t think someone can deny u access to landlocked property, has to be some kind of agreement in place to allow u access. believe I’d talk to the other landowner and put something in place if he did sale to provide u access
 

keeruss8

6 pointer
Jun 19, 2016
449
Marrowbone
I have a couple landlocked pieces around me. One was purchased by lumber mill because they had access on other side. The other one is owned by a mill and I've been told he can take me to court and force an easement but he has to pay to me a certain amount. That was sold way back in the day, no time recently. As far as I know they have no legal easement
 

slickhead slayer

12 pointer
Nov 14, 2005
6,701
VP OF ADMIN Development
I don’t think someone can deny u access to landlocked property, has to be some kind of agreement in place to allow u access. believe I’d talk to the other landowner and put something in place if he did sale to provide u access

You are making the assumption that the way he accesses his property is the historical deeded right of way. It may or may not be.
There are lots of landlocked property in the state. Legally figuring out where the original right of way is, and then legally retaining it can be very challenging.
 

ManofManyStangs

8 pointer
May 4, 2009
588
I don’t think someone can deny u access to landlocked property, has to be some kind of agreement in place to allow u access. believe I’d talk to the other landowner and put something in place if he did sale to provide u access

My attorney said more than likely I would have to pay fair market value for an easement. He's still researching.
 


Latest posts

Top