Is 'Possom one thing even a coyote won't eat??

Discussion in 'Varmint Hunting' started by Valley Station, Jan 6, 2003.

  1. Valley Station

    Valley Station Cyber-Hunter

    Seem like coyotes have had a major impact on most wildlife , except, a durn possom. Hardly see a groundhog out in the country any more. The groundhogs and foxes that seem to be surviving the coyote are those living closest to people.
    Possom get out in the open and are easy to catch, but, they're thick.
    Would have thought the coyote would have eliminated them by now.
    Possom so nasty , even a coyote won't eat one?? Anybody know ??
     
  2. yotekiller

    yotekiller Banned

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    Jan 20, 2002
    .
    Valley i know of nothing that a coyote won't eat,even heard of them eating remains of coyotes.I was coming from bowling green the other night and saw on just out of town dining on possum ale carte' roadkill.

    When the skunks start mating and splattered on the road,an already stinking coyote can become about the worst smelling critter in the woods.
     
  3. Chet Parsons

    Chet Parsons Fawn

    15
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    Dec 26, 2002
    Kingston, TN.
    I’ve often wondered how possums manage to exist... you would think they would have went extinct eons ago.
    Where coyotes roam, our groundhog/fox population has also declined. Although groundhogs are not the smartest critters they are learning. Instead of dening in the edges of fields like they have in the past, the smarter ones have started to use higher more open areas towards the middle of the fields. I suspect the elevated open areas gives the hogs better visibility and a little more time to reach the safety of their holes before becoming coyote fodder. As far as possums... who knows? There must be a million of those things per square mile.

    Good calling...
    coyotehunter
     
  4. GSP

    GSP 14 Pointer Staff Member

    13,077
    11
    Dec 12, 2001
    Montrose
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">’ve often wondered how possums manage to exist... you would think they would have went extinct eons ago. <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Hard to believe they cleaned the meat off old T-Rex's bones too???
     
  5. Ky Headhunter

    Ky Headhunter 8 pointer

    738
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    Dec 10, 2001
    Peach Grove, Ky, USA.
    I'll eat just about anything if it's deep fried & peppered, but I wouldn't eat 'possum. Can't speak for the coyotes.
     
  6. Chet Parsons

    Chet Parsons Fawn

    15
    0
    Dec 26, 2002
    Kingston, TN.
    Like the song says, country boys can survive.
    During the great depression people used what they had, money was scarce. Small game like possum were utilized in many rural areas as a food source. Those was hard times, my father remembers hunting and eating them. Ammo was expensive if it could even be found at the general store, the common possum was easy to catch. Dad, like many people of that time, had a dog trained to hunt possums. After the dog treed, it was just a matter of climbing the tree and dispatching the critter. Seldom was a shot needed to retrieve the quarry, most of the time the marsupial would just sulk up and play dead when tapped with a stick. After a successful night, the animals were skinned for their hides, his mother would then take over. Cooked wrong and they are quite greasy. To make the varmints palatable, Granny would use a double broiler (the type used for home canning). A layer of dry oats were scattered in the bottom of the broiler. The seasoned, whole, cleaned possum was laid on the canning screen above the oats. The lid was put on the pan and into the old wood burning cook stove it would go. As the meal was roasting in the oven, the fat would drip down into the oats and be captured. When done, the oats were fed to the hogs, the meat was fed to the family. Yuummmmm! Baked possum and fried taters.

    And they say those were the good ol’ days, Big Mac anyone?
     
  7. ez

    ez 8 pointer

    you never know what you would eat until you are really hungry.........i thank the man upstairs i've never been there........ez
     
  8. GSP

    GSP 14 Pointer Staff Member

    13,077
    11
    Dec 12, 2001
    Montrose
    I heard the same story from my dad (now 74) about eating possums.
    They caught them and put them in a cage. They would feed them to fatten then up some more and flush there systems. Dad says they were good eating. I've never tried one myself.
    Ez made a post that made me think of something my uncle said one evening. My uncle got off boat on Normady and crawled across Europe in WWII. Ended up with 7 major battle ribbons.
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">you never know what you would eat until you are really hungry.........i thank the man upstairs i've never been there........ez<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">
    My uncle never talked much. I was eating supper one night at his house and my cousin said, "I don't like this". My uncle dropped his fork on his plate and said, "boy, until you survive a month eating only rat meat, you won't know what's good"!
    Since that day over 30 years ago have I never thought anything BAD!

    Those were men!
     
  9. INKYHUNTER

    INKYHUNTER Cyber-Hunter

    1,242
    101
    Dec 10, 2001
    Bowling Green, KY, USA.
    I can remember people eating possum when I was young. They always said that it had much more grease then coon. I never ate possum as my mother who was whisk out of Cinncinati and brought to Mclean Co as a young bride would not have let me tried one even if I had wanted. She didn't like frying rats (squirrel) or froglegs, however she would because I dragged them home.
     

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