German Shorthairs?

Discussion in 'Small Game Hunting' started by Chessie202, Jan 2, 2016.

  1. Chessie202

    Chessie202 6 pointer

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    Nov 15, 2004
    Harrison Co.
    Do any of you have or have hunted with a GSP? Considering a new pup and was thinking about one. I would like one if I could make it a versatile dog. Pointing grouse & quail as well as retrieving doves and ducks. I've hunted setters my whole life and raised and hunted a Chesapeake during my waterfowl days. Just curious about the experience you all have had with this breed.
     
  2. WBall

    WBall Spike

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    Nov 16, 2008
    lexington,ky
    I run GSP 's and love them for quail and grouse. But I've I was getting a do all dog I'd check out a Drat. Not saying a GSP won't do it all. But I hunt with a couple guys that run Drats and many of day we have waterfowled in the mornings and quail hunted them in the afternoons. They are a neat breed.
     
  3. mcdenney

    mcdenney 12 pointer

    4,867
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    Dec 16, 2002
    Wildcat Country, USA.
    I have two GSP's, great breed. IMO there is nothing wrong with a GSP for what you are wanting to do but you will probably have to locate a breeder who has GSP's that focused on versatile breeding. A lot of GSP's are bred for field trials anymore. The more versatile bloodlines dogs are completely different acting dogs. I have one of each. You may also do some research on Kurzhaar's as well. Drat's are great dogs as well and very versatile also. Good luck!
     
  4. riverview

    riverview 8 pointer

    Look for NAVHDA bred dogs. Expect to pay $600-$1000 for a pup.
     
  5. claynut69

    claynut69 6 pointer

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    Nov 14, 2007
    pulaski, co
    My son has a Kurzhaar and it is remarkable, retreivers ducks as well as any dog I've hunted with, then points quail and pheasant. Hunts dead as well.
     
  6. craigsexton

    craigsexton Fawn

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    Oct 1, 2010
    Check out the GWP instead. German wire hair. They'll do all you want! I love mine. Great dog. [​IMG]

    This pick is old. He's 4 now and a real hunting machine. I'll see if I can more pics.


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  7. craigsexton

    craigsexton Fawn

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    Oct 1, 2010
    [​IMG]


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  8. Mountain_Moose

    Mountain_Moose Fawn

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    Dec 15, 2015
    We have 2 male and 1 female gsp and we hunt quail and grouse over them. They are great versatile dogs. I even use mine as squirrel retrievers, even though they don't tree. I'm relatively new to the bird dog scene, but I couldn't ask for better pointing hunters.
     
  9. bigredhunter

    bigredhunter 6 pointer

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    Jan 30, 2012
    Boyle County
    A GSP from good NAVHDA lines should accomplish what you are looking for. If you do a lot of cold hunting you may want to possibly look at a longer haired dog. The draht of Gwp would work. I would also recommend a pudelpointer. They are also a German dog and they were used as one of the founding breeds for a wirehair. I just got a pudelpointer and will be using him to hunt upland, waterfowl, track deer, and shed hunt. Go to pudelpointer.org for more info.
     
  10. hitch

    hitch 10 pointer

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    Jan 16, 2008
    Nobody is going to like this opinion of GSP, Wirehair etc, but it should be said I guess. The whole looking for an everything dog is confusing because if a person is a serious grouse/quail hunter there's really no reason to look at anything other then a pointer or English setter. In the world of pointing breeds nothing compares to those two breeds when it comes to finding and pointing birds, if it did Ames and other well respected trials would have many entrants that were breeds other than setters/pointers.

    On the same token if you're looking for a retriever and are a serious duck hunter a lab or a chessie are the best bets for the exact same reasons.

    I understand everyone knows someone with a shorthair, brittany, etc that will point every grouse in a cover and retrieve 100 ducks in the same day, lol. However, if you want to have a good dog for a particular hunting style why not buy the upper echelon breeds rather then one that sort of does everything but doesn't really excel at any of them?

    I've yet to see one of the "versatile" breeds do anything in the field even close to what a setter/pointer or lab/chessie is capable of.
     
  11. woodsandwater

    woodsandwater 6 pointer

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    Aug 20, 2008
    What's a drat? Have a link or something?? Is that slang or a misspell lol


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  12. remman2

    remman2 6 pointer

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    Oct 11, 2014
    I know we are going to catch some heat but I completely agree with you.


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  13. tbrothers

    tbrothers 6 pointer

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    Aug 29, 2011
    Cecilia
    I agree with you both on having 2 separate dogs. I am not saying that they are not good dogs but I would rather have and English Setter for birds and a Lab for ducks any day.
     
  14. hitch

    hitch 10 pointer

    1,065
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    Jan 16, 2008
    I'm assuming a Drathar is what he was referring to
     
  15. riverview

    riverview 8 pointer

    I'll agree a shorthair is not going to compete with labs on ducks in most cases. And your probably not going to one win at Ames. But I don't see a lot of difference between mine and the setters and pointers I have hunted with or the ones at our club trials. My 11 year male stretches out to 500 yards in the cover at Peabody, farther than that hunting edges in farm country. My year old pup will run out to about 200 yards. You find find lines in all 3 breeds who will be bred to hunt close or stretch out.
     

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