Garden, and REAL food Quest 2019

Discussion in 'Food Preparation, Camp Cooking and Recipes' started by barney, Feb 28, 2019.

  1. carnivore

    carnivore 12 pointer

    5,504
    3,601
    Nov 17, 2007
    Ky
    BLASPHEMY!
     
    Dark Cloud and barney like this.
  2. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    9,787
    7,324
    Oct 11, 2005
    I don't make concoctions with spices anymore. I used to, and wondered why grandmother never had. After the first year I realized why she didn't.

    Plain maters and juice canned will stay fresh for several years if not a decade in a cool dark cellar. With spices added off tastes start developing pretty quick.
     
  3. bondhu

    bondhu 12 pointer

    3,045
    2,229
    Jul 3, 2015
    Battle Run
    ^^^ I second that. If I have everything from garden I will make salsa. Other than that my salsa ,marinara, etc come from whole canned tomatoes.
    Canned salsa is good, but it doesn't compare to.... salsa veggies in the food processor.Pour the top juice from home canned tomatoes in. Pulse till chunkiness is achieved and then in with the whole maters and pulse 3 - 4 times. The juice from jar should be only enough to get veggies to a almost liquid form for me. Then I pour off extra juice or it will be to watery. If I have had to many drinks and screw up to watery...... it's chilly time
     
    drakeshooter, Feedman and barney like this.
  4. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    9,787
    7,324
    Oct 11, 2005
    Me and my younger son spent the day yesterday picking and canning more mater products. He had picked up a couple of packets of Mrs. Wages salsa mix and wanted to make it. He added chopped fresh bells, and the last of the onions from the garden to make a chunky salsa. It turned out delicious! We also ran another couple of buckets of maters for juice. The maters still taste really good, but with dying vines the solids are way down. We ended up reducing the original 4 gallons of juice down to 3 gallons to get an acceptable product. We also canned a couple more pints of pickled Cayennes because the first run of them are already disappearing at an alarming rate! In my honest opinion, there is NO better flavored hot pepper than long slim Cayennes! I grew another mildly hot pepper this year called Rooster Spur. It's an heirloom from Louisiana that supposed to have great flavor. I wanted to try it pickled also to see how it compares to the Cayennes. So we made a couple of pints of those as well.
    [​IMG]
    Oh... I also made those 2 quarts of pickled green maters. I can't wait to try them in a month or so!
    [​IMG]
     
  5. bondhu

    bondhu 12 pointer

    3,045
    2,229
    Jul 3, 2015
    Battle Run
    Nothing like seeing rusty lids from years gone by. Great job barney
     
    dirtstalker, drakeshooter and barney like this.
  6. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    9,787
    7,324
    Oct 11, 2005
    Some of the new Chinese rings are junk. I've gotten to where I remove and wash all of the good old rings after processing because they can't be replaced now.
     
    Dark Cloud, drakeshooter and bondhu like this.
  7. bondhu

    bondhu 12 pointer

    3,045
    2,229
    Jul 3, 2015
    Battle Run
    I agree we have plenty old rusted rings. Especially if you don't remove ring after seal.
     
    barney likes this.
  8. ptbrauch

    ptbrauch 12 pointer

    10,424
    797
    Nov 10, 2004
    The OC
    I've seen where a lot of people make up the plain sauce, put it in the jars, and then dump in a scoop of seasoning on top before putting the lids on. That way they're not cooking the seasoning when they cook the tomatoes down.

    And I know for a fact that properly packaged seasoned tomato sauces (pasta, pizza, etc) will last for years with no loss of flavor--especially if stored in a cool dark cellar. And that's hot-filled sauce, not pressure canned.
     
    barney likes this.
  9. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    9,787
    7,324
    Oct 11, 2005
    I know you have worked in the industry and know this stuff inside out. So maybe you can answer. I'm not disputing you at all, just hoping you can shed some light.
    But, I get a slightly rancid, more bitter flavor especially in canned pasta sauce after a year or two if it's not used up. I do use fats along with the spices when making the sauce. It's not only me that detects the off flavors, the whole family does. I have always figured it had to do with the preservatives added to commercially canned sauces? Maybe not.
     
  10. ptbrauch

    ptbrauch 12 pointer

    10,424
    797
    Nov 10, 2004
    The OC
    Some of the sauces we make contain oil (fats)--olive, soybean, and/or corn, but none of them contain any preservatives. We see a change in the color before we notice any flavor changes.

    I'm just guessing, but I would think the off flavors you're tasting is just too much of one spice. When first made, some spices come through more than others, but when allowed to age, the flavors will better blend together. We find that a good week or so for that to happen. Sometimes people will add some extra of something because it's not a prominent as they want, or its covered up by something stronger. Oregano is added for it's bitterness. Sometimes garlic can impart some bitterness too. Same with parsley.

    Side note: Oregano is only found in pizza sauce, never pasta sauce.

    Do you pressure can it, or just hot fill it?
     
  11. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    9,787
    7,324
    Oct 11, 2005
    I always water bath can anything other than straight juice.

    You're probably spot on with the spices coming through more as it ages, and I do use oregano and quite a bit of garlic in my pasta sauce. Tastes great the day it's made, gets a little more bitter the older it gets. Thanks!
     
  12. ptbrauch

    ptbrauch 12 pointer

    10,424
    797
    Nov 10, 2004
    The OC
    Another option is to just can plain tomato sauce and then add the spices to the sauce in a pan as you're heating it up to use it.
     
    bondhu likes this.
  13. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    9,787
    7,324
    Oct 11, 2005
    That's what I've been doing for years now.
     
    drakeshooter and bondhu like this.
  14. barney likes this.
  15. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    9,787
    7,324
    Oct 11, 2005
    Simple is better when it comes to sauces. I had a couple of friends who are foodie's that toured Italy in 2014. They went off the beaten path into the countryside to try the local food. The first thing that they told me was REAL Italian food didn't taste anything like what was called Italian in the states.

    My grandfather immigrated here around 1900 from Naples, Italy. He taught my grandmother how to cook Italian. He made his own fresh pasta too because the general stores around here didn't carry pasta at the time. His sauce was very simple compared to other Italian cook's elaborate sauces. He had a basic sauce that contained maters fresh or canned, onions, garlic, bacon fat or olive oil, and marjoram. When marjoram wasn't to be had oregano was substituted. The sauce wasn't simmered all day long either, it was cooked just until it would start plopping from the pan, and poured over the pasta.

    The old man made Bolognese sauce on occasion too. It consisted of fatty pork, maters, onions, garlic, and marjoram covered and simmered until the pork fell apart and the sauce was thick. This was served over pasta as well. Both pasta sauces were always covered with freshly grated Parmesan when he could get it.
     
    JR in KY, Dark Cloud and drakeshooter like this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice