Garden, and REAL food Quest 2019

Discussion in 'Food Preparation, Camp Cooking and Recipes' started by barney, Feb 28, 2019.

  1. You’re a better man than me, ain’t nobody getting away with a pickup load of wood I split and stacked. Not unless I said so.
     
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  2. Bee

    Bee 8 pointer

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    "no good deed goes unpunished'
     
  3. JR in KY

    JR in KY 12 pointer

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    AND.
    That reminds me, it's about time to start cutting Firewood for the Winter.
     
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  4. barney

    barney 12 pointer

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    I just had 3 or 4 Charleston Gray plants in the watermelon patch, but they produced 10 or so melons. All of gray melons were nice 30-35 lbs., but this was the biggest. I may save a few seeds from it because I know there's a really good chance it was cross pollinated with the Sangria melons growing with them. The Yellow Buttercup seedless melons have sterile pollen so no chance of it being crossed with them. The Charleston Gray, and Sangria are both delicious, so a cross of the two should be a deliciously interesting project for next year!
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    It's always a good sign when they split wide open when you touch them with the knife! The brix was just 12 on this one, not great, but plenty good enough to enjoy.
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  5. Dark Cloud

    Dark Cloud 12 pointer

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    Yea man
     
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  6. Meatstick

    Meatstick 10 pointer

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    Question for you Barney if you don't mind.
    When I was a kid, me and a buddy planted some watermelons for a few years. Little 5 or 6 pound, round melons with YELLOW flesh. It's been 25 years, but I remember them being awesome watermelons. I'd split em in half and didn't need anything but a pocket knife to put half of one away.
    Neither of us can remember what they were called, and haven't seen em since. Any idea?
     
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  7. barney

    barney 12 pointer

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    More than likely it was the variety, Yellow Doll. I've grown them a few times and they are productive and tasty.
     
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  8. Meatstick

    Meatstick 10 pointer

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    Thank ya sir. I'll let you know about em in about 52 weeks haha
     
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  9. barney

    barney 12 pointer

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  10. dirtstalker

    dirtstalker 10 pointer

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  11. Bone_Chaser

    Bone_Chaser 8 pointer

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    The crimson sweets are starting to stand out. I'm hoping some will be ready this weekend.
     
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  12. dirtstalker

    dirtstalker 10 pointer

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    Ive always struggled on judging when a watermelon is ready in the field. Whats some good signs or tips on when to pick them?
     
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  13. Bone_Chaser

    Bone_Chaser 8 pointer

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    Probably the most fool proof way is to go by the tendrils. The little squiggly things that allow vines to climb. Trace the melon stem back to the main vine and you will find one. Picture #1 still has a way to go, #2 is okay to pick but will get better for a few more days and #3 is close. I like to let them go a few days past when the tendrils dry if weather permits. Barney did a lengthy post on the subject with many more ways earlier in this thread.
     
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  14. barney

    barney 12 pointer

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    Here's part of my post from back in the thread:

    When I start picking watermelons, I start by noticing if the fruit are showing. By that I mean as you look at the field if you don't see melons, they are still growing. Just leave them alone, no need to even check. Once fruit start to reveal themselves, it's time to start checking some of the older fruit closest to the crown, or center of the plant. The melon should look duller than the fruit that are still growing and glossy green. A ripe fruit will also look faceted instead of perfectly round. If you see that it's time to inspect further. Once you get to the melon check the tendril on the stem closest to melon, it should be brown, and dry. If you have gotten to this point and all of the indicators I have mentioned are there.. make a fist with your hand and take your index knuckle and place it directly in the middle of the melon and slowly apply just the least bit of pressure downwards on the melon, kinda like squeezing off a shot from a rifle.. Just slow and steady. If you hear and feel just the slightest "buckle-crunch", you have a perfectly ripe melon. I think they are perfect exactly one day after perfectly ripe.
     

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