Food plots

Rob7

6 pointer
Oct 18, 2004
400
Let’s say you got mostly big woods to hunt and not the best soil. What would you attempt to plant, if anything? As far as accessibility, could probably get to a few spots with the wheeler and then of course hand tools. My fear is that is the plots aren’t very big it will be ate down before it gets started. Thoughts?
Might consider Winter Wheat. Last year I traveled many miles across several farms with my seeder/spreader full on the back of the ranger. It was not running but due to all the vibration seed leaked out as I drove. I was amazed about a month later when I could noticeably see and recognize the winter wheat 1' wide trail growing along all the logging roads and places I had driven where it had simply fallen out. If you could mow it down tight prior to planting and then simply broadcast it in I think you could have some success.
 

theprofessor

8 pointer
Oct 14, 2013
614
Shenandoah Valley
Let’s say you got mostly big woods to hunt and not the best soil. What would you attempt to plant, if anything? As far as accessibility, could probably get to a few spots with the wheeler and then of course hand tools. My fear is that is the plots aren’t very big it will be ate down before it gets started. Thoughts?

My buddy and I do a half acre, and we put a solar powered electric fence around it. Keeps everything out until it’s grown up. The initial cost, for the generators and spools of wire plus the stakes—I don’t know. He had all that when we started. It takes him, me and my son about two hours on each end to put it up and take it down. We use an RTV to move all the equipment, running it around and laying it out in the field, so if you don’t have one of them… you could probably use your truck.

I also have no idea whether this is all standard procedure, so pardon me if I’m stating the obvious.

We put the plot in mid August, all turnips this year, and take the fence down around mid-October. There’s usually food left in the plot through early January when the season ends here. Usually 1-2 deer get past the fence each year, but that’s it.
 

keeruss8

6 pointer
Jun 19, 2016
483
Marrowbone
What did you do to prepare for broadcasting the wheat? I'm thinking of doing 2 perennial plots for year round food and spring protein and would also like to add some fall forage in them - cereal grains most likely. This would be in addition to 2 or 3 fall plots of grains, brasicas, tubers and radishes for late season forage.
You can just broadcast right into your existing plots with ww. That's what I've been doing the last couple years with good results. I always wait till good chance of rain in forecast and it pops right up.
 

James Scott White

6 pointer
Oct 17, 2020
310
Rowan County
I’m with the majority on here. Clover is super hard to beat. I plant mine in the fall with a grain- either wheat or rye. Grains will be there early winter and first thing to green up then when you mow it you got that good clover base to carry you on. I only mow mine about twice and always with a rain. You can frost seen alfalfa into the clover if you want more diversity. Deer freaking love alfalfa and clover lol. Been my best plots by far.

You can also broadcast rye and small brassicas into the clover with a good rain in the early fall to give them a little more salad bar option come hunting season. I think you’ll find that your plots will almost always be hotter in the late season when your in Ag country. You can’t compete with farmers production but you will have the only game in town when they harvest.
 

wolverine1

12 pointer
Oct 19, 2004
5,122
breckinridge county
I’m with the majority on here. Clover is super hard to beat. I plant mine in the fall with a grain- either wheat or rye. Grains will be there early winter and first thing to green up then when you mow it you got that good clover base to carry you on. I only mow mine about twice and always with a rain. You can frost seen alfalfa into the clover if you want more diversity. Deer freaking love alfalfa and clover lol. Been my best plots by far.

You can also broadcast rye and small brassicas into the clover with a good rain in the early fall to give them a little more salad bar option come hunting season. I think you’ll find that your plots will almost always be hotter in the late season when your in Ag country. You can’t compete with farmers production but you will have the only game in town when they harvest.

Think thats very good advice! Im seeing exactly that with my clover/rye food plots. The deer have started hammering my radishes and brassicas the last week or so.
 


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