Field dressing

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by kyoutdoorsman, Nov 2, 2019.

  1. kyoutdoorsman

    kyoutdoorsman 12 pointer

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    Jan 19, 2016
    Can you field dress one with out getting sick, lol I have seen grown men puke trying to do it. Like me.
     
  2. bgkyarcher

    bgkyarcher 12 pointer

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    BG
    Meh, even gut shot deer don't phase me.... It stinks, yes, but it's just a deer.....
     
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  3. Nock

    Nock 12 pointer

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    butler co
    Start peeling wet coyotes. You will have no problem with deer.
     
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  4. bgkyarcher

    bgkyarcher 12 pointer

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    BG
    yuck....
     
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  5. Nock

    Nock 12 pointer

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    butler co
    You get used to it.
     
  6. Nock

    Nock 12 pointer

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    Sep 9, 2012
    butler co
    707A1BA5-4972-4EE9-B971-00A62780184C.jpeg
     
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  7. bgkyarcher

    bgkyarcher 12 pointer

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    Those things stink while they're alive....
     
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  8. bullet225ho

    bullet225ho 6 pointer

    400
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    Oct 25, 2004
    Crooked Creek
    LOL breath through your mouth and not your nose.

    you have the ability to do that without holding your nose.

    wear rubber gloves (I never have, but I figure it'll make you feel better)

    The biggest thing is tread very lightly around the guts of the deer. Open the deer up from butt to sternum and let the guts go where they want to go and take your knife and slice the membrane that separates the "guts" from the lungs/heart(lower cavity/upper cavity. Once you got that membrane severed (all the way around the rib cage) then reach waaaaayyyyyyy up in there above the heart with one hand and then with the other hand go just a bit further with your knife (depending on how far you opened the deer up....you could be elbow deep at this point) and slice the windpipe and anything else holding the heart, lungs, liver in place. After that...just pull the heart, lungs and liver out and you can basically turn the deer over and it'll all fall out. Whalla...done. Then walk to closest creek and rinse off blood and such from your arms and knife. Yeah, water is pretty cold right now but cold water gets blood out good.

    Also, The heart and liver (if not shot up) make great table fare as some others on here would probably attest to. Pickled deer heart is great. Fried Liver is really good.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2019
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  9. bgkyarcher

    bgkyarcher 12 pointer

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    BG
    Hmmm... Interesting. I have always start at sternum, with deer laying downhill, if possible. Always found that to be easier to get into the cavity without puncturing the stomach/intestines. Always looking to learn something, have I been doing it the hard way?
     
  10. KY Swamp Beagler

    KY Swamp Beagler 12 pointer

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    Feb 20, 2011
    the swamps of western KY
    Field dressing one with the back legs headed downhill helps a lot.
     
  11. bullet225ho

    bullet225ho 6 pointer

    400
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    Oct 25, 2004
    Crooked Creek
    Well, You are correct. It's best to "start" the cut at the sternum...aka getting through the hide. Then cut down somewhere between the back legs (buck or doe) A knife that has a turned cutting edge is great for this so you minimize puncturing the intestines.

    And better yet to have head up hill, butt down hill.

    even better is to lodge a leg over your shoulder to "spread apart" the area just for better access.
     
  12. bullet225ho

    bullet225ho 6 pointer

    400
    21
    Oct 25, 2004
    Crooked Creek
    I used to use a dedicated gut hook knife with a utility type blade in it to open a deer up initially and then I'd use a separate Gerber hunting knife to cut membrane and upper organs out.

    I switched to a Case Hunter/Trapper knife and it has both blades and a small saw blade. It's actually useful and can prune some wrist size branches if needed for shooting lanes and such.

    https://caseknives.com/collections/hunting/products/amber-bone-peach-seed-jig-hunter-trapper

    This Christmas I'm hoping for an upgrade as this version has locking blades (reduce risk of fold back) I've never had an issue with knife above, but I'm aware it could happen as it's not locking.

    https://caseknives.com/products/amber-bone-peach-seed-jig-xx-changer-w-gut-hook
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2019
  13. elmucho277

    elmucho277 6 pointer

    390
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    Aug 4, 2009
    northern ky
    That pic really shows how small those things actually are without all the puffy hair
     
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  14. Bubbles

    Bubbles Banned

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    Oct 25, 2016
    I use a Buck drop point blade that has a gut hook on the back side. No worries for me. In fact, i have 3 of them.

    Deer guts dont even approach the odor of a rabbit. Those things are the worst i have dealt with.
     
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  15. davers

    davers 12 pointer

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    Jul 14, 2014
    Kentucky
    Nope! Doesn't bother me a bit. In fact I check and examine each and every organ when field dressing a Deer. Having a degree in Biology, I've performed lots of dissections in College on various animals.
     
    carnivore likes this.

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