Fence post source

Discussion in 'Community Forum' started by muddhunter, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. muddhunter

    muddhunter 12 pointer

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    louisville
    Anybody know a good source for treated fence posts? Fixing to put up a 60 yard section of 4 board fencing and trying to put together all my components. Thanks.

    I’m in Louisville area so southern Indiana, Shelbyville, Bullitt, and surrounding areas are in play.
     
  2. rcb216

    rcb216 12 pointer

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    Any TSC or Southern States or feed mill type of store.
     
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  3. Feedman

    Feedman Cyber-Hunter

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    In the basement
    Rural king in Shelbyville
     
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  4. OLE RASPY

    OLE RASPY 10 pointer

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    I’m gonna use use telephone poles from local power company. Buddy of mine is gonna give me a few but I’m fixin to call and get on the list.
     
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  5. reivertom

    reivertom 12 pointer

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    Find you a stand of Locust trees....they will outlast you as posts.
     
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  6. JR in KY

    JR in KY 12 pointer

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    It's difficult to find good RED Cedar posts. Locust are good too if you can find them.
    I would Vote Rural King Shelbyville for the best price.

    By the way, what kind of boards are you using? I do NOT like the treated poplar, they don't last as long as Pine.
     
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  7. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    "LIFE EXPECTANCY IN YEARS
    Wood
    Untreated Treated

    Ash 3-7 10-15
    Aspen 2-3 15-20
    Bald Cyprus 7-15 20-25
    Balsam Fir 4-6 10-15
    Basswood 2-3 15-20
    Beech 3-7 15
    Birch 2-4 10-20
    Black Locust 20-25 Not necessary
    Box Elder 2-7 15-20
    Butternut 2-7 15-20
    Catalpa 8-14 20-25
    Cedar 15-20 20-25
    Cotton Wood 2-6 10-15
    Douglas Fir 3-7 15-18
    Elm 4 15
    Hackberry 3-7 10-17
    Hemlock 3-6 10-25
    Hickory 5-7 15-20
    Honey Locust 3-7 10-20
    Larch 3-7 10-20
    Maple 2-4 15-20
    Oak (red) 5 15
    Oak (white) 10 15-20
    Osage Orange 20-25 Not necessary
    Pine 3-7 25-30
    Red Cedar 15-20 >20-25
    Red Mulberry 7-15 15-30
    Redwood 10-15 20-30
    Sassafras 10-15 20-25
    Spruce 3-7 10-20
    Sweetbay 2-6 10-20
    Sweetgum 3-6 20-30
    Sycamore 2-7 20-25
    Tamarack 7-10 15-20
    Tupello (black) 3-7 15-20
    Willow 2-6 15-20
    Yellow Poplar 3-7 20-25

    Information originally developed by UGA Extension"
     
  8. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    "The most common wooden posts are pine pressure treated with CCA (chromated copper arsenate.) These posts have a greenish color, and they last longer and are harder than older treatments such as creosote and Penta (penta-chlorophenol.) ...Be careful when buying wooden posts that the posts are properly treated for contact with the soil. Most treated lumber (including 4-by-4s often used as posts) bought in builder's supply stores is treated at 0.25 lb of CCA per cubic foot of lumber. This level of treatment will not protect against termites. Sawn lumber should be treated at 0.5 to 0.6 lb/ft3 of CCA if it is to be in contact with the earth. Fence posts can be treated at 0.4 lb/ft3. Many people are tempted to use "landscape timbers" for fence posts because they are extremely cheap at times due to over supply. These timbers are a byproduct of the plywood industry. They are what is left after the veneer has been peeled off of a large log. The danger in using these for fence posts is that many times they are not treated for ground contact since they are not designed to support a load and sometimes are not labeled, so it is unclear what, if any, treatment has been applied..."

    https://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=C774&title=Fences for the Farm
     
  9. JR in KY

    JR in KY 12 pointer

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    Well, She's correct for once. Landscape timbers will last less than 10 years, because even though they may have some treatment, just not much.
    A neighbor proved this point rather dramatically a few years ago.
     
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  10. HuntressOfLight

    HuntressOfLight 12 pointer

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    Well, you learn a thing or two about all, after owning a logging corporation, among others. I can see my father resetting fence posts on the farm, as if it were just yesterday.
     
  11. rcb216

    rcb216 12 pointer

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    Robertson Co.
    We put in red cedar that we cut on our farm in 86. Still holding fence. Had to go through bout 6-7 years ago and re staple them as the white rotted but that red is like steel. They don’t look good but are still there.
     
  12. muddhunter

    muddhunter 12 pointer

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    louisville
    I’ll take a look at rural king in Shelbyville. Thanks for the info.
     

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