Farmers

Discussion in 'Community Forum' started by Tman6493, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. DH13

    DH13 12 pointer

    7,472
    2,909
    Jan 13, 2012
    Shelby county
    If you are going to try and do it to make money. THEN DONT DO IT. Im doing it as a something to do to keep me busy and it does. If I break even when I sell calves I feel pretty good about it. If I make a little money then I feel better.
     
  2. dirtstalker

    dirtstalker 10 pointer

    1,571
    1,333
    Nov 20, 2009
    Clay County
    Not a farmer myself. But know several, and been around it most of my life. Average joe farmer, will be lucky to break even every year, and that is on a good year. I had the oppurtunity to head the farming direction in life, but decided the constant struggle throughout life wasnt worth it. Im going to say, that 98% of farmers probably are either in debt, or in all honesty live below poverty level if you go by net income every year.
    With that being said, if you can find a 'niche' market for something in your area, that few else are doing, you might can be successful.
    On the hemp topic, went to a few classes, seminars on it, sheesh, seemed like a pure nightmare to farm it. I have no clue how any small farmer would ever deem it a good idea to grow it, but there seems to be plenty trying it out. From some info i got in the classes though, the farmers who try to stick with the hemp production, will bw at the forefront of the list of those who can get contracts to grow pot when it becomes legal.
     
    bigbonner likes this.
  3. Mossy Oak Boykins

    Mossy Oak Boykins 6 pointer

    231
    265
    Sep 11, 2019
    where my boykins take me
    i know several who have tried the hemp lots still hanging in barn,do your research lots of lawsuits against
    Gen-Canna lots who tried it last yr still havent been paid from what im seeing and hearing hemp would be last thing id get into
     
    drakeshooter and bigbonner like this.
  4. DH13

    DH13 12 pointer

    7,472
    2,909
    Jan 13, 2012
    Shelby county
    No market no one wants to buy it. Farmers here that raised it said the wont raise it again. Some bushed hogged theirs down. A bunch still in barns. Nobody to buy it. A scrub program that started and is failing.
     
  5. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    10,656
    9,861
    Oct 11, 2005
    For a starting farmer, I would get into and specialize in a niche market.
     
    Bee, Munson, drakeshooter and 3 others like this.
  6. Tman6493

    Tman6493 6 pointer

    421
    335
    Oct 28, 2013
    Louisville
    Do any of you raise chickens or turkeys that are dropped off and picked up by bigger companies?
     
  7. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    10,656
    9,861
    Oct 11, 2005
    Why have a middle man? If you can produce it there is no problem selling it.
     
    DH13 likes this.
  8. 1wildcatfan

    1wildcatfan 12 pointer

    8,795
    4,139
    Jan 2, 2009
    raised n Bullitt Co.
    Thats what my BILs do. Chickens, turkeys and sometimes hogs. 80,000 birds in their houses at times.
     
  9. timer

    timer 10 pointer

    1,246
    844
    Feb 20, 2013
    La Grange
    There is no doubt in my mind that hemp will one day eclipse the stature that tobacco had in its heyday. But based on what I learned last year, that day is a long way off.

    The future of hemp is in fiber. Hemp fiber is an amazing product with many, many potential industrial uses. But there are many problems. First, there are no processors for fiber in Kentucky. I've seen estimates that you can grow four to six tons per acre and this bulk has to be hauled to a processor. The shipping costs alone are - in my estimation - greater than the potential revenue. Second, there are no proven implements for harvesting. Third, even if the product is harvested and hauled to a processor, there are very few buyers. The entire system has to be developed and that is gonna take years.

    I tried to grow hemp for the oil. I bought (expensive) cloned plants from someone I thought would be trustworthy. Some of the plants just didn't grow. Now, this was my first year trying to grow hemp and this could have been my fault, but some of my plants did real well and some didn't grow at all. I've talked with folks in California, Colorado and Oregon who told me the issue was the plants. I can't say for sure.

    The problem with weeds can't be overstated. I spent most of the summer chopping weeds. Hard work and something I'm not gonna do with as fragile a market as currently exists. Hemp is a lot like tobacco. Don't believe that stuff about hemp choking out the weeds. It just isn't true.

    The states seem to see taxing farmers who try to grow hemp as a major source of future revenue. License fees in KY are high, and I understand they are even higher in other states.

    And finally, after all the work growing and harvesting, the test from the state said my hemp was "hot." The percent THC came back as 0.41 and it couldn't be any higher than 0.39. That's another $250 (at least) to the state for a retest. I had a buyer lined up in Colorado (shipping hemp across state lines is a whole nother story) but after mine tested hot he found another seller.

    I do not see any way that I get even 1/3 of the money back that I put into the product. And that does not include all the time and effort I spent planting, cultivating, weeding and harvesting.

    Now I will say this. I use CBD oil on my hands for my arthritis. I do not take it internally. I have found that it helps the pain and stiffness more than any otc or prescribed drug that I've tried. I've seen studies written by lots of folks - most of whom I believe are in some way connected with drug companies - that say that CBD can't work if applied externally. Perhaps the effects I've personally experienced are all in my head. I don't care. As long as my hands don't hurt after I rub it on, I'm gonna continue to buy it. The point is that I kinda believe in the curative power of CBD and if it works for others like it has for me, then people who have tried it will continue to buy it and use it like I have. That will create a demand which will result in the price for the plants increasing.

    I have a decent sized cow/calf operation on my farms and I didn't invest any money in this crop that I couldn't afford to lose. But I'm afraid a lot of folks did. Something might happen to make me change my mind (maybe I'll be able to sell the plants for a lot more than I'm expecting to get) , but as of right now I'm not planning on growing this crop again.

    timer
     
  10. bigbonner

    bigbonner 10 pointer

    1,854
    1,743
    Aug 5, 2015
    I started working jobs during school and after I graduated high school but there was no steady decent paying jobs around . My vehicle was lucky to get me 10 miles from home. I worked running backhoes , dump trucks and bulldozers. With no good jobs around I turned to sharecropping and then finally bought my farm. We worked long hard hours and was doing good growing tobacco and cattle. We invested every dollar we made back into the farm. No money was wasted on vacation or things we did not need , except maybe a gun or two.
    Now farming has gone down hill and making money with a farm like mine is impossible. Cattle losses and market swings is a hit and miss on making good money. Soybeans and corn is at a low price and takes a large amount of flat land and lots of equipment.
    If you have the cash in hand to pay for the farm you want and the equipment you need then you may be ok . Just don't expect to make lots of money.
    Don't buy junk equipment thinking you can make do . Buy decent equipment and work all week or buy junk and hope you can work tomorrow without breaking down.
    I would look for another line of work .
     
  11. timer

    timer 10 pointer

    1,246
    844
    Feb 20, 2013
    La Grange
    I believe there is a good future for farming, but it is gonna be much different than it is today. The future is in direct to consumer sales - selling farm products directly to consumers either at farmers markets or on-line. The commodity crops will soon be monopolized by huge corporations, but there will always be someone looking for fresh blackberries, or honey or tomatoes fresh out of the garden. I've planted several chestnut trees....
     
  12. Mossy Oak Boykins

    Mossy Oak Boykins 6 pointer

    231
    265
    Sep 11, 2019
    where my boykins take me
    Timer you have said and explained as perfect as anyone ive heard sorry for your loses and like you said lots of people lost more than they could afford.do have a friend his is still hanging in barn but hes building greenhouses as we speak said hes selling plants next yr but hes got Big backing
     
    timer likes this.
  13. bigbonner

    bigbonner 10 pointer

    1,854
    1,743
    Aug 5, 2015
    That is why I am staying out of Hemp . I won't even try and grow it until I see a market for it .
    The tobacco buyout had money set aside for farmers on cost share basis. But there has been nothing to replace tobacco crops.
    Remember all the ideas put out by the department of agriculture that was supposed to make farmers rich and forget about growing tobacco.
    Lamas , buffalo, goats, emu's, ostriches, grapes , fruit trees, berries, vegetables atc. In my opinion none of these have made farming profitable.
    A lot of farmer paid big money to get into these hobbies to find out they are useless.
     
    Dark Cloud and JR in KY like this.
  14. bigbonner

    bigbonner 10 pointer

    1,854
    1,743
    Aug 5, 2015
    My son tried the produce thing and weather destroyed his 3 acres last two years. The thing is that when he did have lots of vegetable , so did everyone else and you could not give the stuff away.
    Bees are something else he has and they are hard to keep alive . A lot of honey is shipped in by the barrels and sold as home grown honey. There is also a lot of fake honey out on the markets.
     
  15. barney

    barney 12 pointer

    10,656
    9,861
    Oct 11, 2005
    Sowing is optional, reaping is mandatory.
     
    Bee likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice