Electric vehicles

ribsplitter

Cyber-Hunter
Jan 19, 2004
3,556
Greenup, ky, USA.
Hell. I swear to God my my 3/4 ton truck gets that, when I set the SuperChip to economy. Diesel tho, so you still got me there on economics.
I only run it on EXTREME when I'm in town trying to impress women I can't touch, but it'll get about 9mpg then lol
Mine gets better mpg on my highest horsepower tune. The towing tune drops it down to around 19 mpg, everyday average driving I'm getting 22-23 in the hills, but I've seen 27mpg several times on trips. 3/4 ton Duramax LML efi live tune.
 

Meatstick

12 pointer
Oct 25, 2013
5,553
Washington County
My truck is 2500HD gas, I was getting 11 with 35’s. I stepped tires down to 33’s today. I have programmer set on economy.

Other than to my eyes my truck looks like a Tacoma now with baby tires, hopefully I’ll get back in that 14-15mpg range. My Fiesta ST got 37mpg on trip to Lexington and home Sunday, both are paid for, I’ll keep burning fossil fuels for now.
I have a 3500HD gas, as well. 2004 6.0, beast of a truck with 250k and it just wont quit. I love the truck, but a fuel sipper it ain't lol. At it's wollered out state, it gets 9mpg, loaded or otherwise. But I keep her took care of. Likely my favorite truck I've ever had
 

ancienthunter

8 pointer
Dec 25, 2011
614
Over the Hill
I have a 3500HD gas, as well. 2004 6.0, beast of a truck with 250k and it just wont quit. I love the truck, but a fuel sipper it ain't lol. At it's wollered out state, it gets 9mpg, loaded or otherwise. But I keep her took care of. Likely my favorite truck I've ever had
have a 2500HD gas, except mine has the 8.1, will pass everything on the road except a gas station.
 

east_ky_hunter

10 pointer
Aug 29, 2010
1,002
East Ky
My truck is 2500HD gas, I was getting 11 with 35’s. I stepped tires down to 33’s today. I have programmer set on economy.

Other than to my eyes my truck looks like a Tacoma now with baby tires, hopefully I’ll get back in that 14-15mpg range. My Fiesta ST got 37mpg on trip to Lexington and home Sunday, both are paid for, I’ll keep burning fossil fuels for now.

I only get 15 in my ‘19 tundra but I put bigger tires on it. It was still only getting 16.5 before. Not the most economical but I hope to keep it until 300k or the wheels fall off. 15 in a 2500 sounds dang good.
 

reivertom

12 pointer
Dec 17, 2007
7,212
Greenup Co.
EVs are basically a city grocery getter at this time. As long as they make gas cars, I'll not buy one. As long as the batteries wear out in 5-8 years and cost more than the vehicle is worth, they make absolutely no sense. I have a 21 year old truck that I'd take over a new EV, if I had to drive it daily.
 
I am an electrical engineer with more than 40y experience in the energy industry. As old uncle Joe would say, "Here's the Deal Man". A new Tesla will have a 100 kWh battery to get a 300 mile range. You cannot discharge it 100% every day. That would leave you walking and shortens the life of the battery. The battery technology is Lithium Ion. Those are about as efficient as can be acquired today. Still, they are only about 90% efficient. The charger also has losses during the charging process. So, if your battery is down to 30% at the end of the day, it will need 70kWh to re-charge. Combined with the losses, you will use about 91.5 kWh to charge the car from your home charging station. Depending on your current average cost of power, it can run $10-18 per charge. All that varies by your typical daily commute.

But,.... This is a big one. An average American all electric home with a high efficiency heat pump will have an electric demand of 5-7 kW. The average home uses 11,000 kWh per year. Adding only one EV to the home energy use adds a demand of about 9.5kW to the power grid when it is charging. While much of this can be done late at night, for those who work during the day and come home at 5-6pm, the first thing they will do is plug in the EV to charge. It takes about 10hrs to do so. Then they will cook dinner, turn on the TV, lights and the AC or heat will be running, wash & dry clothes, you get the drill. There will be times in the late afternoon hours when the peak load on the grid from that home is tripled.

OK, no problem when one home out of 100 is using one EV. But what happens when that becomes one in 2 homes or worse every home has one EV? What if there are two EV's in use at the home? You do not have to be an engineer or an energy expert to soon realize that adding one or more EV's to even a small percentage of the homes in most locations of the USA will overload the local power distribution circuits during the peak loading seasons. As the use of EV's proliferates, it will overload them more and more often. Smart chargers that control the time when your EV charges and delays it until later at night when you are asleep will help to mitigate the problem but also limits the time to charge your EV. You might find that you are not getting a full charge in the morning and that limits the range and usefulness of the vehicle. I commute over 100 mi per day. That is one third of the range of a high end Tesla every day. Most of my miles are high speed interstate and that uses more energy due to the aerodynamic drag which increases with speed. Thus, I would easily burn thru more than half the battery every day. That does not include the miles I drive during the day. For me, it is NOT a good choice.

For widespread use of EV's to be successful, we will need to invest in large scale improvements in the capacity of both our power generation infrastructure and our electric transmission grids. We will also have to upgrades at least some of the local power distribution systems. Probably not all and not all at once but the investment will be substantial. Guess what that does to the cost of electricity?

Anyone who says we will power the country near term (next 30y) with only wind and solar generation is either a liar or a fool or BOTH. Most politicians are not scientists. They are lawyers and do not understand or want to study energy issues. The only congressman I have encountered to date who really gets it is KY's Thomas Massie from over near Ashland. He seems to have a grasp of the issue. But until we are having rolling blackouts it is hard to get the attention of most of our leaders. For use to power the grid without fossil fuel generators we will need large scale energy storage and the battery technology available today is just not economical to do the job. There is not enough research being done to fix this either.

25y ago, while speaking to a national energy group in Houston, I called for international research on development of the next evolution of power generation technology. It would be a 30y effort. Something business cannot and will not do. It is one of the few things government does well. Long term R&D with no prospect of a profit from it for decades. Everyone nodded and applauded and as of today 25y later, nothing has been done to speak of. Invest in candles brothers and sisters. Hard times are coming.
 

Tankt

12 pointer
Dec 26, 2019
4,916
Kentucky
I am an electrical engineer with more than 40y experience in the energy industry. As old uncle Joe would say, "Here's the Deal Man". A new Tesla will have a 100 kWh battery to get a 300 mile range. You cannot discharge it 100% every day. That would leave you walking and shortens the life of the battery. The battery technology is Lithium Ion. Those are about as efficient as can be acquired today. Still, they are only about 90% efficient. The charger also has losses during the charging process. So, if your battery is down to 30% at the end of the day, it will need 70kWh to re-charge. Combined with the losses, you will use about 91.5 kWh to charge the car from your home charging station. Depending on your current average cost of power, it can run $10-18 per charge. All that varies by your typical daily commute.

But,.... This is a big one. An average American all electric home with a high efficiency heat pump will have an electric demand of 5-7 kW. The average home uses 11,000 kWh per year. Adding only one EV to the home energy use adds a demand of about 9.5kW to the power grid when it is charging. While much of this can be done late at night, for those who work during the day and come home at 5-6pm, the first thing they will do is plug in the EV to charge. It takes about 10hrs to do so. Then they will cook dinner, turn on the TV, lights and the AC or heat will be running, wash & dry clothes, you get the drill. There will be times in the late afternoon hours when the peak load on the grid from that home is tripled.

OK, no problem when one home out of 100 is using one EV. But what happens when that becomes one in 2 homes or worse every home has one EV? What if there are two EV's in use at the home? You do not have to be an engineer or an energy expert to soon realize that adding one or more EV's to even a small percentage of the homes in most locations of the USA will overload the local power distribution circuits during the peak loading seasons. As the use of EV's proliferates, it will overload them more and more often. Smart chargers that control the time when your EV charges and delays it until later at night when you are asleep will help to mitigate the problem but also limits the time to charge your EV. You might find that you are not getting a full charge in the morning and that limits the range and usefulness of the vehicle. I commute over 100 mi per day. That is one third of the range of a high end Tesla every day. Most of my miles are high speed interstate and that uses more energy due to the aerodynamic drag which increases with speed. Thus, I would easily burn thru more than half the battery every day. That does not include the miles I drive during the day. For me, it is NOT a good choice.

For widespread use of EV's to be successful, we will need to invest in large scale improvements in the capacity of both our power generation infrastructure and our electric transmission grids. We will also have to upgrades at least some of the local power distribution systems. Probably not all and not all at once but the investment will be substantial. Guess what that does to the cost of electricity?

Anyone who says we will power the country near term (next 30y) with only wind and solar generation is either a liar or a fool or BOTH. Most politicians are not scientists. They are lawyers and do not understand or want to study energy issues. The only congressman I have encountered to date who really gets it is KY's Thomas Massie from over near Ashland. He seems to have a grasp of the issue. But until we are having rolling blackouts it is hard to get the attention of most of our leaders. For use to power the grid without fossil fuel generators we will need large scale energy storage and the battery technology available today is just not economical to do the job. There is not enough research being done to fix this either.

25y ago, while speaking to a national energy group in Houston, I called for international research on development of the next evolution of power generation technology. It would be a 30y effort. Something business cannot and will not do. It is one of the few things government does well. Long term R&D with no prospect of a profit from it for decades. Everyone nodded and applauded and as of today 25y later, nothing has been done to speak of. Invest in candles brothers and sisters. Hard times are coming.
Thank you for this post. It is very well articulated and informative.

An upgrade to the existing grid will definitely be needed. I don't think anyone argues that point.
 

bigbonner

12 pointer
Aug 5, 2015
4,644
I am an electrical engineer with more than 40y experience in the energy industry. As old uncle Joe would say, "Here's the Deal Man". A new Tesla will have a 100 kWh battery to get a 300 mile range. You cannot discharge it 100% every day. That would leave you walking and shortens the life of the battery. The battery technology is Lithium Ion. Those are about as efficient as can be acquired today. Still, they are only about 90% efficient. The charger also has losses during the charging process. So, if your battery is down to 30% at the end of the day, it will need 70kWh to re-charge. Combined with the losses, you will use about 91.5 kWh to charge the car from your home charging station. Depending on your current average cost of power, it can run $10-18 per charge. All that varies by your typical daily commute.

But,.... This is a big one. An average American all electric home with a high efficiency heat pump will have an electric demand of 5-7 kW. The average home uses 11,000 kWh per year. Adding only one EV to the home energy use adds a demand of about 9.5kW to the power grid when it is charging. While much of this can be done late at night, for those who work during the day and come home at 5-6pm, the first thing they will do is plug in the EV to charge. It takes about 10hrs to do so. Then they will cook dinner, turn on the TV, lights and the AC or heat will be running, wash & dry clothes, you get the drill. There will be times in the late afternoon hours when the peak load on the grid from that home is tripled.

OK, no problem when one home out of 100 is using one EV. But what happens when that becomes one in 2 homes or worse every home has one EV? What if there are two EV's in use at the home? You do not have to be an engineer or an energy expert to soon realize that adding one or more EV's to even a small percentage of the homes in most locations of the USA will overload the local power distribution circuits during the peak loading seasons. As the use of EV's proliferates, it will overload them more and more often. Smart chargers that control the time when your EV charges and delays it until later at night when you are asleep will help to mitigate the problem but also limits the time to charge your EV. You might find that you are not getting a full charge in the morning and that limits the range and usefulness of the vehicle. I commute over 100 mi per day. That is one third of the range of a high end Tesla every day. Most of my miles are high speed interstate and that uses more energy due to the aerodynamic drag which increases with speed. Thus, I would easily burn thru more than half the battery every day. That does not include the miles I drive during the day. For me, it is NOT a good choice.

For widespread use of EV's to be successful, we will need to invest in large scale improvements in the capacity of both our power generation infrastructure and our electric transmission grids. We will also have to upgrades at least some of the local power distribution systems. Probably not all and not all at once but the investment will be substantial. Guess what that does to the cost of electricity?

Anyone who says we will power the country near term (next 30y) with only wind and solar generation is either a liar or a fool or BOTH. Most politicians are not scientists. They are lawyers and do not understand or want to study energy issues. The only congressman I have encountered to date who really gets it is KY's Thomas Massie from over near Ashland. He seems to have a grasp of the issue. But until we are having rolling blackouts it is hard to get the attention of most of our leaders. For use to power the grid without fossil fuel generators we will need large scale energy storage and the battery technology available today is just not economical to do the job. There is not enough research being done to fix this either.

25y ago, while speaking to a national energy group in Houston, I called for international research on development of the next evolution of power generation technology. It would be a 30y effort. Something business cannot and will not do. It is one of the few things government does well. Long term R&D with no prospect of a profit from it for decades. Everyone nodded and applauded and as of today 25y later, nothing has been done to speak of. Invest in candles brothers and sisters. Hard times are coming.
Do you have any idea of how many homes will burn down because of a power overload?
I am sure that charging two electric cars and the strain of regular house usage will overload some breaker boxes and the wiring.
They were not wired for that much electric pull.
 

aaronc

12 pointer
Jul 21, 2009
3,540
Leitchfield
I am an electrical engineer with more than 40y experience in the energy industry. As old uncle Joe would say, "Here's the Deal Man". A new Tesla will have a 100 kWh battery to get a 300 mile range. You cannot discharge it 100% every day. That would leave you walking and shortens the life of the battery. The battery technology is Lithium Ion. Those are about as efficient as can be acquired today. Still, they are only about 90% efficient. The charger also has losses during the charging process. So, if your battery is down to 30% at the end of the day, it will need 70kWh to re-charge. Combined with the losses, you will use about 91.5 kWh to charge the car from your home charging station. Depending on your current average cost of power, it can run $10-18 per charge. All that varies by your typical daily commute.

But,.... This is a big one. An average American all electric home with a high efficiency heat pump will have an electric demand of 5-7 kW. The average home uses 11,000 kWh per year. Adding only one EV to the home energy use adds a demand of about 9.5kW to the power grid when it is charging. While much of this can be done late at night, for those who work during the day and come home at 5-6pm, the first thing they will do is plug in the EV to charge. It takes about 10hrs to do so. Then they will cook dinner, turn on the TV, lights and the AC or heat will be running, wash & dry clothes, you get the drill. There will be times in the late afternoon hours when the peak load on the grid from that home is tripled.

OK, no problem when one home out of 100 is using one EV. But what happens when that becomes one in 2 homes or worse every home has one EV? What if there are two EV's in use at the home? You do not have to be an engineer or an energy expert to soon realize that adding one or more EV's to even a small percentage of the homes in most locations of the USA will overload the local power distribution circuits during the peak loading seasons. As the use of EV's proliferates, it will overload them more and more often. Smart chargers that control the time when your EV charges and delays it until later at night when you are asleep will help to mitigate the problem but also limits the time to charge your EV. You might find that you are not getting a full charge in the morning and that limits the range and usefulness of the vehicle. I commute over 100 mi per day. That is one third of the range of a high end Tesla every day. Most of my miles are high speed interstate and that uses more energy due to the aerodynamic drag which increases with speed. Thus, I would easily burn thru more than half the battery every day. That does not include the miles I drive during the day. For me, it is NOT a good choice.

For widespread use of EV's to be successful, we will need to invest in large scale improvements in the capacity of both our power generation infrastructure and our electric transmission grids. We will also have to upgrades at least some of the local power distribution systems. Probably not all and not all at once but the investment will be substantial. Guess what that does to the cost of electricity?

Anyone who says we will power the country near term (next 30y) with only wind and solar generation is either a liar or a fool or BOTH. Most politicians are not scientists. They are lawyers and do not understand or want to study energy issues. The only congressman I have encountered to date who really gets it is KY's Thomas Massie from over near Ashland. He seems to have a grasp of the issue. But until we are having rolling blackouts it is hard to get the attention of most of our leaders. For use to power the grid without fossil fuel generators we will need large scale energy storage and the battery technology available today is just not economical to do the job. There is not enough research being done to fix this either.

25y ago, while speaking to a national energy group in Houston, I called for international research on development of the next evolution of power generation technology. It would be a 30y effort. Something business cannot and will not do. It is one of the few things government does well. Long term R&D with no prospect of a profit from it for decades. Everyone nodded and applauded and as of today 25y later, nothing has been done to speak of. Invest in candles brothers and sisters. Hard times are coming.

Great post...wonder how much coal we will burn while maxing out the existing grids.
 

PUBLIC RAT

10 pointer
Feb 18, 2014
1,628
So has anybody talked about truck drivers and there rigs. Don't know the current laws about downtime in there log books but something will have to change for them also.
 

reivertom

12 pointer
Dec 17, 2007
7,212
Greenup Co.
I am an electrical engineer with more than 40y experience in the energy industry. As old uncle Joe would say, "Here's the Deal Man". A new Tesla will have a 100 kWh battery to get a 300 mile range. You cannot discharge it 100% every day. That would leave you walking and shortens the life of the battery. The battery technology is Lithium Ion. Those are about as efficient as can be acquired today. Still, they are only about 90% efficient. The charger also has losses during the charging process. So, if your battery is down to 30% at the end of the day, it will need 70kWh to re-charge. Combined with the losses, you will use about 91.5 kWh to charge the car from your home charging station. Depending on your current average cost of power, it can run $10-18 per charge. All that varies by your typical daily commute.

But,.... This is a big one. An average American all electric home with a high efficiency heat pump will have an electric demand of 5-7 kW. The average home uses 11,000 kWh per year. Adding only one EV to the home energy use adds a demand of about 9.5kW to the power grid when it is charging. While much of this can be done late at night, for those who work during the day and come home at 5-6pm, the first thing they will do is plug in the EV to charge. It takes about 10hrs to do so. Then they will cook dinner, turn on the TV, lights and the AC or heat will be running, wash & dry clothes, you get the drill. There will be times in the late afternoon hours when the peak load on the grid from that home is tripled.

OK, no problem when one home out of 100 is using one EV. But what happens when that becomes one in 2 homes or worse every home has one EV? What if there are two EV's in use at the home? You do not have to be an engineer or an energy expert to soon realize that adding one or more EV's to even a small percentage of the homes in most locations of the USA will overload the local power distribution circuits during the peak loading seasons. As the use of EV's proliferates, it will overload them more and more often. Smart chargers that control the time when your EV charges and delays it until later at night when you are asleep will help to mitigate the problem but also limits the time to charge your EV. You might find that you are not getting a full charge in the morning and that limits the range and usefulness of the vehicle. I commute over 100 mi per day. That is one third of the range of a high end Tesla every day. Most of my miles are high speed interstate and that uses more energy due to the aerodynamic drag which increases with speed. Thus, I would easily burn thru more than half the battery every day. That does not include the miles I drive during the day. For me, it is NOT a good choice.

For widespread use of EV's to be successful, we will need to invest in large scale improvements in the capacity of both our power generation infrastructure and our electric transmission grids. We will also have to upgrades at least some of the local power distribution systems. Probably not all and not all at once but the investment will be substantial. Guess what that does to the cost of electricity?

Anyone who says we will power the country near term (next 30y) with only wind and solar generation is either a liar or a fool or BOTH. Most politicians are not scientists. They are lawyers and do not understand or want to study energy issues. The only congressman I have encountered to date who really gets it is KY's Thomas Massie from over near Ashland. He seems to have a grasp of the issue. But until we are having rolling blackouts it is hard to get the attention of most of our leaders. For use to power the grid without fossil fuel generators we will need large scale energy storage and the battery technology available today is just not economical to do the job. There is not enough research being done to fix this either.

25y ago, while speaking to a national energy group in Houston, I called for international research on development of the next evolution of power generation technology. It would be a 30y effort. Something business cannot and will not do. It is one of the few things government does well. Long term R&D with no prospect of a profit from it for decades. Everyone nodded and applauded and as of today 25y later, nothing has been done to speak of. Invest in candles brothers and sisters. Hard times are coming.
The people pushing this from the top....the wannabe Globalist "overlords", know all of this perfectly well. Their goal isn't saving the planet, their goal is making all of us less mobile, less in control, and easier to push around and manipulate. I'm not an electrical engineer, and just by reading and a little study, I know what you say is 100% true. Nothing this bunch tries to push on us, will effect them, so they don't care what hardships it causes. Nothing they push is good for us. They are sick, evil people.
 


Latest posts

Top