Cursed farm?

HuntressOfLight

12 pointer
Nov 23, 2019
11,404
Guarding my lovely bluebirds
Exactly, mainly, 2 guys. Suffering same thing here on my farm (40 acres). I for the most parthave quit hunting it since my 14 year old grandson started hunting it when he turned 6. He has been killing 2 off it every year, and 3 last year, there is maybe 150 acres wooded that joins us. We still have plenty of sign, but under pressure deer get nocturnal. You can plant food plots, and enhance all you want, but they will just wait until dark when they know they are being hunted.

Lol, well, I had my mind upon other predators. I find this thread to be extremely interesting, like a "who done it" mystery. Seems like the land, based upon the limited description, would be home to various smaller critters drawing in some larger predators, possibly spooking the deer. I would be looking for their various signs, and some may be following the creek. That's my theory, and I'm sticking to it, for now. Seems like one of the KY Private Lands Biologists could prove useful.

Amish have to follow game laws too

Seems to be a repetitive conversation upon this forum. I found it to be an extremely interesting post, recently made within yet another thread, that they don't charge for deer meat. All I know is that I really like some potato salad made by one or more of them around here, and I typically prefer my own compared to all others. I intend upon eventually learning whom makes it.
 

CRFmxracer

12 pointer
Sep 9, 2010
3,707
louisville kentucky
Get out of your comfort zone, get in the woods. Do some still hunting. Take 20 steps, wait 5 minutes, take 20 steps. Etc. but make sure you always have the wind in your face. Pay attention to the wind
 

James Scott White

6 pointer
Oct 17, 2020
310
Rowan County
Sounds like a great place and has a lot of potential. I’ve been working on a very similar sounding property. Lots of hardwoods, plenty of water, decent cover, and several old clear cuts/fields. My experience on what seems like good habitat is that there is really just not enough really high quality food sources; if combined with over pressure your up the creek without a paddle. Personally I’ve found that once a field converts to mostly warm season grasses, deer don’t hit it regularly in the fall/winter. Ive found they like weeds, grains, and legumes- not grasses so much. Mowing multiple times without reseeding encourages grasses, defers weeds; while perennial legumes like clover and alfalfa need resewing every 5 years or so. I would consider talking to the land owner about letting you put in some food plots. Doesn’t have to be anything fancy- a couple acres would go a long way over time; ryegrain and clover are super easy to plant (just need a backpack sprayer and seed spreader) and are very condition tolerant- just don’t over hunt the plots. Heck, if he’s bailing it he might let you just spread winter rye in his hay field or you can frost seed clover into it and he’d probably be none the wiser; but you should still obviously ask lol.

Multiple plot locations allows the herd to be stretched and feel less social pressure, allowing more deer to comfortably use the property without feeling cramped up- this is especially important for big bucks as they don’t like to compete for a food source with a bunch of does.

I’ve added 5 acres of food plots in the last year and my deer herd has definitely increased; yesterday I took the biggest buck that’s been killed there in 20+ years. I can’t advocate enough for food plots. They totally change a property.
 
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web splitter

8 pointer
Feb 3, 2015
655
I have a box stand that I hunt during modern gun and a hang on stand in the same area. I’ve never been too good at picking out stand spots. Lol
And my brother has a tripod he hunts in gun season and then a hang on he bow hunts that’s in a different part of the field he hunts.
If you have been hunting these same spots for years then change it up. Deer become wise to your technique and basically pattern you. Once a deer busts you they will be looking in that spot for you every time they walk by..
Set up stands near trails that lead to and from what you think are their food & bedding areas. Set them with the wind in mind. I've got 3 stands all within a 200-250yd stretch. Not because I want to clutter up the area but because I hunt each during different situations and I also don't want to over hunt any of them. You would be amazed at the difference a couple hundred yards can make.
Lastly, scout in February/March and you will have a much better idea of their preferred trails.
 

FF/EMT516

8 pointer
Nov 22, 2020
684
Blackrock, Ky
D87252C6-E517-4083-B657-83CB1E996053.jpeg 49C5F5EC-FA34-4166-85EB-60EF86E22B02.jpeg The first pic is my brothers 2018 deer from this farm and the second is from 2020 and nobody ever seen him or heard of him being killed
 

FF/EMT516

8 pointer
Nov 22, 2020
684
Blackrock, Ky
Sounds like a great place and has a lot of potential. I’ve been working on a very similar sounding property. Lots of hardwoods, plenty of water, decent cover, and several old clear cuts/fields. My experience on what seems like good habitat is that there is really just not enough really high quality food sources; if combined with over pressure your up the creek without a paddle. Personally I’ve found that once a field converts to mostly warm season grasses, deer don’t hit it regularly in the fall/winter. Ive found they like weeds, grains, and legumes- not grasses so much. Mowing multiple times without reseeding encourages grasses, defers weeds; while perennial legumes like clover and alfalfa need resewing every 5 years or so. I would consider talking to the land owner about letting you put in some food plots. Doesn’t have to be anything fancy- a couple acres would go a long way over time; ryegrain and clover are super easy to plant (just need a backpack sprayer and seed spreader) and are very condition tolerant- just don’t over hunt the plots. Heck, if he’s bailing it he might let you just spread winter rye in his hay field or you can frost seed clover into it and he’d probably be none the wiser; but you should still obviously ask lol.

Multiple plot locations allows the herd to be stretched and feel less social pressure, allowing more deer to comfortably use the property without feeling cramped up- this is especially important for big bucks as they don’t like to compete for a food source with a bunch of does.

I’ve added 5 acres of food plots in the last year and my deer herd has definitely increased; yesterday I took the biggest buck that’s been killed there in 20+ years. I can’t advocate enough for food plots. They totally change a property.
The lady who owns it told us we could do whatever we wanted to down there. She worked at the school we went to and worked with my mom for years so she’s a family friend now. There used to be a guy who cropped it. I’ve thought about getting someone to crop it again for free food plots.
 

HuntressOfLight

12 pointer
Nov 23, 2019
11,404
Guarding my lovely bluebirds
The lady who owns it told us we could do whatever we wanted to down there. She worked at the school we went to and worked with my mom for years so she’s a family friend now. There used to be a guy who cropped it. I’ve thought about getting someone to crop it again for free food plots.

This is current and may help. Although I have spoken with a few, and they are very nice, I never asked about what all is entailed in having one visit a property, but that's what they do.

https://fw.ky.gov › DocumentsPDF
Web results
private lands biologists

upload_2021-11-14_22-18-20.jpeg

Jun 30, 2021
 

James Scott White

6 pointer
Oct 17, 2020
310
Rowan County
The lady who owns it told us we could do whatever we wanted to down there. She worked at the school we went to and worked with my mom for years so she’s a family friend now. There used to be a guy who cropped it. I’ve thought about getting someone to crop it again for free food plots.
It’s some work but I promise you will not be disappointed if you do them. They completely changed the game for me- I cannot recommend them enough.
 


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