Concrete foundation pour Adair Co advice

Discussion in 'Community Forum' started by Navy Bowhunter, Aug 31, 2015.

  1. Navy Bowhunter

    Navy Bowhunter 6 pointer

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    Jun 25, 2013
    Knifley, KY
  2. RackedUP

    RackedUP 8 pointer

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    Oct 30, 2013
    Yep. I'd budget closer to the $7500 side to be safe.
     
  3. 150PandY

    150PandY BBBC Members

    2,837
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    Sep 9, 2004
    Frankfort, KY, USA.
    I figure you will need about 29yds of concrete for a 6" Slab 50x18 and a footer on each side 50' 24"x18" roughly. Im not sure of the specs you have on your footer. Concrete seems to run around $100 per yard not counting labor.
    So figure $3,000 for concrete alone.
     
  4. Eastkybuckhunter

    Eastkybuckhunter Fawn

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    Jul 21, 2008
    Jackson, KY
    Poured a bit over 6 yards here last week. Me and a few buddies did the work (one being a pro) costed 103 bucks per yard. Plus what we had in our materials for forming etc.
     
  5. cedar creek

    cedar creek 10 pointer

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    Sep 7, 2014
    Fiber waste of money , get heavy gauge wire panels.
     
  6. GrouseAssasin

    GrouseAssasin 12 pointer

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    Aug 1, 2009
    Jackson, ky
    I poured a 30x30 slab three years ago for my garage, 6" thick. Think I ordered 12.5 yards and the bill for the concrete was just a fuzz under $1200 delivered. Gravel was a couple hundred bucks, put dense grade 4-5" thick on already packed dirt and packed it with a backhoe. The extra labor I "hired" was two retired concrete gurus that would work for beer. I second the plastic between the gravel and concrete. I did wire and a 2'x2' grid of 1/2" rebar with 4500psi mix, no fiber. This November will make it three years and not so much as a hairline crack (knock on wood). I was told I didn't necessarily need both the wire and rebar but I figured it would be better to go overkill then regret it later.

    Something possibly worth noting on the fiber: Guy at the mix plant told me if it was for a dog kennel or if I had a dog that would be spending a lot of time in the garage not to use the fiber. He said over time as the surface of the concrete wears down the little fiberglass shards will start sticking up and get embedded in your dogs paw pads and hurt them. Anybody else heard this?
     
  7. Navy Bowhunter

    Navy Bowhunter 6 pointer

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    Jun 25, 2013
    Knifley, KY
    That sounds painful. I pretty much have to hire out for all the stuff I need to get the slab and footers poured. It stinks but I got to have the Quonset hut and the cabin finished before I retire from the Navy. Kind of need a place to live. Haha. I have a total of twenty days of leave to take between now and next September. Neighbor in Knifley is going to start the cabin build and I will come up and do what I can along with putting up the Quonset hut.
     
  8. 150PandY

    150PandY BBBC Members

    2,837
    2
    Sep 9, 2004
    Frankfort, KY, USA.
    The wire mesh is good but if you don't get it in the concrete your wasting money and time. I see a lot of people just lay it down and poor the concrete.
     
  9. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

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    Nov 16, 2013
    Northern Kentucky
    This is correct. The steel mat (rebar or mesh) should be in the bottom third of concrete depth. Off the ground. I would not place plastic I between the sub-grade and the concrete. It makes the finishing more difficult and I don't think it does anything as a "vapor barrier." I think it creates more thermal and moisture problems than it prevents.
     
  10. fcfishking

    fcfishking 8 pointer

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    Apr 11, 2010
    Fairdale, KY
    The longer you wait , the more expensive it will be. As you get into cold weather, you will have to add for additives and maybe even concrete blankets if it gets too cold. You need to figure your neat line requirements for concrete (L x W x D /27) and then add about 5-8% for the concrete loss in the chute and truck. If you are going to leave it as a concrete floor, you might want to consider putting in an area drain as well. With a slab that size, I would also cut a couple of contraction/expanion joints in it to keep it from cracking.
     
  11. Navy Bowhunter

    Navy Bowhunter 6 pointer

    196
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    Jun 25, 2013
    Knifley, KY
    I was planning on having a drain installed to a grey water pit. The expansion joints are also something that I was planning on discussing with whoever I decide to hire. This will not be poured until April 2016. I was just trying to do my research and get a good feel for the cost so I knew where my overall budget needed to be. Thanks to everyone for their input.
     

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