Breakfast sausage

Discussion in 'Food Preparation, Camp Cooking and Recipes' started by kyoutdoorsman, Jul 31, 2019.

  1. I was always told an old sow past her prime made the best sausage. Heard that all my life. When I was killing though they were always freshly finished out barrows.
     
    barney likes this.
  2. Bone_Chaser

    Bone_Chaser 8 pointer

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    Nothing off with an old sow, just fatter and a little tougher. I prefer my sausage 80-20 or less fat to lean. Volume wise thats still alot of fat. I'd say most commercial sausage is upwards of 40% fat and tendon.
    Top hogs were 60-65 cents pound a couple weeks ago in Carthage when I went. That is higher than usual. Alot of boars or sows .5 cents.
    I can buy a 150 pound hog for $15-25 more than I can a 30lb feeder pig anymore.
     
    drakeshooter likes this.
  3. Bubbles

    Bubbles 8 pointer

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    We paid 57 cents a pound in Feb i think. In April they were 38 cents a pound i was told. Last year we paid 78 cents a pound. At 38 cents i am gonna kill 2 just for me next time. Cant beat that. It will also justify building a walk in cooler.:)
     
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  4. bigbonner

    bigbonner 10 pointer

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    Sometimes hogs get higher when it is killing time and farmers want to kill and salt the hams , shoulders and midlands.

    I remember years ago when hogs was shipped in and sold at our local market . They were dirt cheap and the hogs looked top notch . After killing and processing the hogs, most farmers I knew , including me, was disappointed as they were the toughest meat we ever had and most threw the meat away . Forget about eating the pork chop , the bone was more tender than the meat.
     
    barney likes this.
  5. bgkyarcher

    bgkyarcher 12 pointer

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    BG
    The hogs we bought never step on dirt, and eat nothing but meal...... They are awesome.
     
  6. bigbonner

    bigbonner 10 pointer

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    These hogs was feedlot fed and brought in by tractor trailer loads. Hogs was cheap and I believe it was back in the mid 80's. Hogs was cheap on the market and farmers may have been feeding something cheap as their food supply . Who really knows but they were all tough meat.
     
  7. Bubbles

    Bubbles 8 pointer

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    I remember cheap prices....back in 95 or so? My uncle was really struggling when it cost more to process a hog than to buy one.

    I already have a spot framed up. Add tin, insulation, and plywood along with an air conditioner and one of those temp over-ride thingamajigs and i should be good to go
     
  8. Bubbles

    Bubbles 8 pointer

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    First time i ever went to a hog farm and there wasnt an over-whelming stench in the air
     
  9. I know hog prices went to crap when I messing with them around 2005.
     
  10. barney

    barney 12 pointer

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    It's in the breeding not in the feeding. Those popular blue rump, Hampshire, Yorkshire crosses are notorious for rubber chops!

    Always pick a red, a spotted, or a black hog, steering clear of black with a stripe around the shoulder which is a Hampshire.

    In my time fooling with hogs I found that Red Wattles were the bestest most tender juicy fleshed hogs I ever raised, and Berkshires came in a close second. I would love to try some other good breeds, especially the Mangalitsa one day.
     
  11. Berkshire crosses are what we were buying.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2019
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  12. Feedman

    Feedman Cyber-Hunter

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    In the basement
    The Hampshire breed started in Kentucky, if my memory serves me correctly
     
    barney likes this.

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