Autumn olive

Discussion in 'Habitat Improvement' started by elkaholic, Aug 29, 2019.

  1. The Wilds

    The Wilds Fawn

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    Dec 16, 2020
    Pikeville
    I don’t believe so
     
  2. The Wilds

    The Wilds Fawn

    11
    1
    Dec 16, 2020
    Pikeville
    Option one: Cut and spray with herbicide (repeatedly)
    Option two: uproot and pull, the spray (repeatedly)
    Option three: burn and spray (repeatedly)
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2020
    elkaholic likes this.
  3. Stone Branch

    Stone Branch 8 pointer

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    Jun 27, 2019
    Lewis county, KY
    Option one: I have found cutting and treating the stump with a 20% glysophate solution to be better than 90% effective at killing autumn olive. Treating the 10% or less that resprout with the same solution applied foliar will finish the job.

    Option two: If you yank an autumn olive bush out of the ground most of the remaining broken off root tips will grow new plants. So yank one plant and you end up with ten plants.

    Option three: burning may damage or even top kill an autumn olive but will never kill the plant.

    Another option four: I have killed or at least severely weakened autumn olive with 20% glysophate foliar treatment. Weakened plants then cut and stump treated will be dead.

    Yet another option five: basal bark treatment with tryclopyr. While I have not used tryclopyr on autumn olive I would bet on close to a 100% kill rate.

    G
     
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  4. bigbonner

    bigbonner 12 pointer

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    Aug 5, 2015
    I am wanting to try a granular killer . I can not remember the name of it but you sprinkle a little amount on the up hill side and it goes to the roots.
    I was wanting to use it on hedgeapple and honey locust. You have to be careful using it close to trees you don't want to kill.
     
  5. Stone Branch

    Stone Branch 8 pointer

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    1,328
    Jun 27, 2019
    Lewis county, KY
    That sounds a bit dangerous. I killed a lot of honey locust with 20% glysophate, Tordon didn't work.

    G
     
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  6. bigbonner

    bigbonner 12 pointer

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    Aug 5, 2015
    I sprayed honey locust and hedgeapples with Glysophate and I have use triclopyr a long with 2-4-D. I thought it had killed the honey locust out but they came back to life this year . I have mixed with water but may have to splurge and use some diesel next time.
     
  7. perrymax

    perrymax 10 pointer

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    Jun 6, 2002
    Bullitt Co, Ky.
    I have killed a bunch with Crossbow mixed at the high rate. (always read entire label on herbicides) The problem is you have to wipe it on the leaves to keep from killing every other tree. Nobody is gonna do that,. They are gonna spray over the top. The kill is noticeably different at different times of year. Pulling them with a loader and a choker works best but takes forever.

    Crossbow is 2,4-D plus triclopyr. I recommend adding methylated seed oil. Seems like it worked better for me. I had to spray some twice.

    I noticed last week that most demon olive still had green leaves. I wonder if the trees will take up the herbicide right now? The only other plant with leaves is honeysuckle witch I don't want either. Most herbicides only work on actively growing plants and only work when contacting the leaf.

    We pay for all these UK Cooperative Offices to guide us on stuff like this and we don't utilize them. The Bullitt Co office gives professional advice.
     
  8. bigbonner

    bigbonner 12 pointer

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    4,374
    Aug 5, 2015
    I have used Crossbow and it works good on Hedgeapple. I went to using Remedy because it was cheaper but has higher amounts of triclopyr per gallon than crossbow.
     
  9. Stone Branch

    Stone Branch 8 pointer

    819
    1,328
    Jun 27, 2019
    Lewis county, KY
    I have noticed that too with honey locust, if the sap is flowing in late winter/spring it just will not take in chemicals.

    G
     
  10. elkaholic

    elkaholic 12 pointer

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    Jan 12, 2012
    Pendleton County
    Honey locust is another problem on my farm. They have gotten too big to bush hog.
     
  11. grinder

    grinder 10 pointer

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    Oct 28, 2003
    harrodsburg, ky, USA.
    Put it right there with bush honeysuckle, been fighting that crap for 20 years. It never ends
     
  12. bowhunter269

    bowhunter269 12 pointer

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    Nov 21, 2006
    Fisherville, KY
    I'm starting to worry about bush honeysuckle..........my experience is it mostly invades fence lines, woods edges, and small strips of woods. One of the farms I hunt now has a wooded hillside being taken over. First I've seen it like that. This year is was hard to see that hillside during November. If it takes over the woods, it will choke out new growth hickory, oak, etc and will likely destroy the woods.
     
  13. grinder

    grinder 10 pointer

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    Oct 28, 2003
    harrodsburg, ky, USA.
    It
    definately will, and does. Actually puts off a toxin that kills other trees. Not to mention retards new growth of native species. It was so bad on my place nothing but bare dirt beneath the bushes.
     
  14. outdoorsman_33

    outdoorsman_33 6 pointer

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    Oct 19, 2008
    Anderson County
    They dont like fire if you can burn. They have a thin bark.
     
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  15. grinder

    grinder 10 pointer

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    Oct 28, 2003
    harrodsburg, ky, USA.
    Southern states can help you out, several different kinds of brush killers. Brushmaster comes to mind, but most any type brush killer. Dont spray on windy days, and be damn carefull you dont get it on desirable trees because it will kill them too. The really big stuff cut down next to ground and paint stump with tordon
     

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