Armadillos: Are you seeing them right now ?

Discussion in 'General Hunting' started by billproxs, May 21, 2012.

  1. billproxs

    billproxs 12 pointer

    3,235
    0
    Nov 1, 2009
    KENTUCKY LAKE
    I have seen several hit in LBL along the Trace, and on Highway 68/80 I have seem them hit along Highway 79 just south of LBL, and east of the Cumberland River. Last summer there was one hit just south of Murray, KY off of Highway 641.

    One of my coworkers lives out next to the Blood River Bay, and he has actually seen a few alive on his hunting lease behind his house. He lives just outside of New Concord in southeast Calloway County.

     
  2. smashdn

    smashdn 12 pointer

    9,272
    357
    Nov 24, 2003
    Palmyra, Kentucky
    As long as you guys have been seeing them I would have thought they would be this far east for sure by now. I haven't seen one around here, yet.
     
  3. ITLXLR8

    ITLXLR8 Spike

    83
    9
    Nov 15, 2011
    I took this pic 10/19/2010 at LBL. I had no idea they were in KY until this thing walked out as we were driving past.

    SDC13690.jpg
     
  4. randy grider

    randy grider 12 pointer

    2,434
    31
    Mar 15, 2006
    Burgin, KY
    In 2010 me and two buddies hunted the north end of LBL in november and we all had armadillo encounters. Wild life officials told us there seemed to be more of them on the North end than south. I reckon they are afraid to cross the bridge???? Maybe afraid of a big ship taking them out ! :)
     
  5. AteUp

    AteUp 12 pointer

    15,706
    13
    Mar 14, 2004
    Luavul
    Yep, don't touch or eat them.
     
  6. AteUp

    AteUp 12 pointer

    15,706
    13
    Mar 14, 2004
    Luavul
    https://www.msu.edu/~nixonjos/armadillo/history.html

    The armadillos belong to the order Cingulata, family Dasypodidae. Their closest living relatives are sloths and anteaters. Together, armadillos (order Cingulata) and sloths and anteaters (order Pilosa) make up the superorder Xenarthra. These animals first evolved around fifty million years ago, in what is now South America.

    Glyptodon and Panocthus: Ancient armadillos
    The earliest armadillo-like creatures were the glyptodon and the panocthus. (If you have seen the movie Ice Age, you have probably seen a glyptodon, at least in cartoon form!) These animals were quite large, about the size of a Volkswagen Beetle. They were also very heavily armored. While modern armadillos have become much smaller, they do retain the shell that first appeared in these ancient armadillo relatives.


    Isolated from the rest of the world, and protected from predators with their bony armor, the armadillos flourished. They were relatively safe from predation; that is, until a land bridge developed between North and South America. Large canine and feline predators moved southward along this bridge, wreaking havoc on the native South American animals. Fossil records show that around seventy percent of the indigenous South American mammals were destroyed. The armadillos were not immune to these new and larger predators — although their shells are made of bone, they are rather thin — even a medium sized dog would have little trouble biting through.

    Armadillos in North America
    Despite all of the pressures caused by the influx of North American predators, the ever-resilient armadillo was not completely eradicated. In fact, the animals staged a counter-attack, moving northward as far as the Ohio river valley. The most widespread of these was the beautiful armadillo (Dasypus bellus), which was nearly identical to the modern nine-banded armadillo in appearance — except the beautiful armadillo was much larger, nearly three times the size of the nine-banded armadillo. Fossilized scutes (the bony plates that make up the shell) from the beautiful armadillo have been found throughout the midwestern United States.

    The beautiful armadillo held onto this territory until about eleven thousand years ago, when for unknown reasons all of the North American armadillo species became extinct. It was not until about 1850 that armadillos re-established themselves north of the Rio Grande. Since then, they have spread throughout the southeastern and midwestern United States, from North Carolina north to central Illinois, and as far west as New Mexico. Further northward expansion has been hampered by the animal’s low resistance to cold temperatures; they have almost no body fat reserves, and must forage for insects constantly. Cold weather means no food; no food means no armadillos. Even short periods of freezing temperatures can be fatal. However, they have had no problems with moving into warmer areas; current population estimates show between 30 to 50 million armadillos in the United States alone. For more information on the recent expansion of armadillos into the United States, see the Armadillo Expansion page. https://www.msu.edu/~nixonjos/armadillo/expansion.html

    Modern Armadillo Species
    Twenty species of armadillo exist today. The most numerous one (and the only one found in the US) is the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus). Others include the giant armadillo (Priodintes maximus), the tatouay (Cabassous tatouay), the six-banded armadillo (Euphractus sexcinctus), the three-banded armadillo (Tolypeutes tricinctus — the only armadillo that can actually roll itself into a ball), the little hairy armadillo (Euphractus vellerosus), and the pink fairy armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus). The endangered pink fairy armadillo has a very unusual shell. It is only attached to the animal along the spine, forming a sort of shield over the rest of the body. It also has an unusual tail, tipped with a shovel-like plate. This burrowing armadillo, with its large front feet and very hairy sides, resembles a cross between a mole and a scaly-backed pink caterpillar. For more information on these and other armadillos, see the Armadillo Species page. https://www.msu.edu/~nixonjos/armadillo/species.html
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
  7. smashdn

    smashdn 12 pointer

    9,272
    357
    Nov 24, 2003
    Palmyra, Kentucky
    More for me.
     
  8. billproxs

    billproxs 12 pointer

    3,235
    0
    Nov 1, 2009
    KENTUCKY LAKE
    I have seen a few hit on the Highway 79 Bridge over Kentucky Lake down by Paris Landing. I think the south end of LBL has a lot of Armadillos also, however that end of LBL is more remote and has less people/tourist. So the south end of LBL probably gets less reports of Armadillos imo.

    The north end of LBL has way more hunters, and tourist so that is probably why the north end of LBL has more Armadillo Reports.

     
  9. grnhd

    grnhd 6 pointer

    363
    24
    Dec 6, 2009
    suwanee,ky
    I've seen 2-3 run over around suwanee-eddyville area.They must be pretty tasty to something,they dont stay on the side of the road long.
     
  10. billproxs

    billproxs 12 pointer

    3,235
    0
    Nov 1, 2009
    KENTUCKY LAKE
    What area was this Armadillo in ?
     
  11. GunCat

    GunCat 8 pointer

    560
    7
    Jan 26, 2006
    Fairview, KY
    Over 2 years ago I saw one in Christian county. When I reported it to F&W they mentioned while that was the first Christian County report they’d already had reports of them as far East as Barren county
     
  12. Pops1960

    Pops1960 6 pointer

    121
    88
    Feb 4, 2011
    I saw on hit on I-65 about 10 miles below the KY state line last week
     
  13. smashdn

    smashdn 12 pointer

    9,272
    357
    Nov 24, 2003
    Palmyra, Kentucky
    Southbound or northbound? I travel that stretch of road every weekday and must have missed him.
     
  14. billproxs

    billproxs 12 pointer

    3,235
    0
    Nov 1, 2009
    KENTUCKY LAKE
    South of Nashville there is always tons of Armadillos hit along interstates 24, and 65. I see several of them every year when I go down to lake Guntersville.

    I think they will move north into central and south central Kentucky.
     
  15. smashdn

    smashdn 12 pointer

    9,272
    357
    Nov 24, 2003
    Palmyra, Kentucky
    Can they swim?
     

Share This Page