7mm magnum

KYhunter79

12 pointer
Dec 11, 2003
3,746
Irvington, KY
I shoot a 7mm mag. I've got it zero'd at 25 yards. But I've been trying to put a box a week through it for the past month and probably the next couple weeks as well. I want to be comfortable and familiar with my rifle as I was with my 30-06. My question is this--if I'm zero'd at 25 yards with 150 grain power points. Where will I be at 50 yards? 100? 200? 300? I probably won't shoot beyond 100-150 but I'm just curious. I've done research online but things vary from place to place. I know there are some guys on here that really know their stuff. I want this information from someone that I trust. I appreciate any help in advance, guys.
 

WILD

12 pointer
Sep 7, 2009
2,342
hick town,ky
if you are going to be shooting that much then you are doing the best thing right there..practice and see what your gun will do.to many varibles to tell you 100%what your gun will do,you are doing the right thing...have fun.
but one thing i can tell you is you have one of the flatest shooting calibers on the planet as far as rifles go.
 

High Rack

12 pointer
Dec 21, 2009
6,250
in the hills
If you are going to shoot it alot, I would get a box of 139 grain hornady's.......shoot them side by side with your 150's on a hundred yard zero.
 

KYhunter79

12 pointer
Dec 11, 2003
3,746
Irvington, KY
No idea on my velocity. I always practice plenty before I head to the field. And I thought maybe there was a chart somewhere telling me what I would be shooting without variables. Without the chance of me pulling it and I've been shooting in a lot of wind. I was just looking for a guideline for what I should be expecting. But thanks anyway, gentlemen.

Basically I've been shooting and it seems to be quite a bit high at 100, more than I thought. Could it be me or does it have more rise than I expected.

But yeah I love the caliber because of its power and range. Just trying to get myself on par with my equipment.
 

mwezell

12 pointer
Jan 22, 2006
4,077
Auburn, KY
No idea on my velocity. I always practice plenty before I head to the field. And I thought maybe there was a chart somewhere telling me what I would be shooting without variables. Without the chance of me pulling it and I've been shooting in a lot of wind. I was just looking for a guideline for what I should be expecting. But thanks anyway, gentlemen.

Basically I've been shooting and it seems to be quite a bit high at 100, more than I thought. Could it be me or does it have more rise than I expected.

But yeah I love the caliber because of its power and range. Just trying to get myself on par with my equipment.

There are always variables. In this case, you need to know PRECISELY....
your ACTUAL velocity
the bullet's ballistic coefficient and weight
SIGHT HEIGHT above the center of the bore(seems like people on here don't believe this for some reason)
And you need an accurate enough rifle/load to stack them into a hole or very small group at 50 to minimize error in pinpointing exactly where the center of the group is. A little error here goes a long way.

With that info you can plug the numbers into a ballistics program and accurately enough predict where the bullet will hit(vertically) at any distance. Atmospheric conditions also play a part to a smaller degree(cold air is denser than warm air), but not enough to make for a miss on a deer. Wind is another story. You can use most ballistics programs to see how much a given wind speed will affect the bullet. It's a lot more than most people think...and the wind is never doing the same thing around here. It can be doing something different several times between 0-100 yards, much worse at longer distances. Even cloud cover vs. full sun makes a difference because light waves bend in the air. This changes where the target appears to be in the scope. Nuttin' to it. And people think benchrest is all about the equipment:rolleyes:. Oh, and a wind from left to right will push the bullet right AND low. A right to left will push it left AND high. A headwind pushes it down, and a tailwind up. This is from a barrel with a right hand twist. It's all physics.
 
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