7mm.08

ptbrauch

12 pointer
Nov 10, 2004
11,024
The OC
Does anyone know of anyone who went on some long distance hunting trip and forgot their ammo?

And if you know someone that happened to, where they able to get their ammo, or did they just have to turn around and come back home?
 

Poorboy

8 pointer
Feb 23, 2005
538
under the bank
I know a guy that forgot his gun and drove 8 hrs. to LBL. There was a store\gas station that the owner was kind enough to lend him a 30-30. This was in the town just outside LBL. He bought a couple of boxes of winchester 30-30 hollowpoints from the guy. I still have one box left. This was over 30 years ago. Does anyone rember who the owner of the station was. It was sure appreciated.
 

Ash12

10 pointer
Oct 21, 2007
1,624
I've never considered that as an issue. The only reason I would, is that you can't ship ammo into some countries. Walmart doesn't need your business and is bad for America in every aspect of their business. You shouldn't shop there regularly and complain about how bad the economy is in the US. I know, everyone goes every once in a while, but you don't have to use them as a primary for anything. I wish they would all close. They ARE the defintion of a monopoly. I don't feel sorry for anyone that uses them as the standard for anything, much less ammunition....sorry.
No offense taken. I am a college student and try to save a few bucks any way that I can.
 

dxtsniper

12 pointer
Nov 7, 2009
2,880
Turn around!
I know a guy that forgot his gun and drove 8 hrs. to LBL. There was a store\gas station that the owner was kind enough to lend him a 30-30. This was in the town just outside LBL. He bought a couple of boxes of winchester 30-30 hollowpoints from the guy. I still have one box left. This was over 30 years ago. Does anyone rember who the owner of the station was. It was sure appreciated.

Nice. Your post brought a smile to my face.
 

daking

12 pointer
Dec 29, 2004
2,604
IMHO, the 7mm/08 is a member of the medium caliber high speed rifles. With a 140 gr bullet, it is essentially the functional equivalent of a 270, a 7x57 and such. I don't believe that any round in its class gives a tremendous advantage over any other. The case could be made that the 7mm/08 has a shorter case, hence the possibility of a compressed load, hence more even ignition for a more consistent shot-by-shot accuracy than some, but in the realm of reality, the bore of the rifle, the concentricity of the chamber to the bore, even lug pressure and a host of other mechanical issues come into play as much as the actual shape of the case. The most important factor is the experience of the rifleman and the confidence the shooter has in his weapon. A guy with a minute and a half, say .284 (an obsolescent caliber) that has used only that rifle for years and is carefully practiced with it will be far more deadly than a guy with the latest, greatest 27 cal or 7 mm round in a 1/2 minute rifle who has no experience with the rig or no confidence with the rig. If you want the best 7mm/08 ever made, find a good one and shoot it every chance you get at everything you can. I've got a vintage Austrian made 30/06 that can only reliably shoot at 1.5 MOA. It seldom misses because I've used it almost exclusively for 30 years. It knows to wobble when I wibble and vise versa. I'm going to a 270 this season, but I'm pretty confident in it and have enough experience to know that a reasonably accurate rifle zeroed correctly will hit the target if I do my part. So in the long run, the more you shoot, the more accurate your rifle becomes. Shoot it often and keep it clean and you'll fear few shots.
 

mwezell

12 pointer
Jan 22, 2006
4,110
Auburn, KY
IMHO, the 7mm/08 is a member of the medium caliber high speed rifles. With a 140 gr bullet, it is essentially the functional equivalent of a 270, a 7x57 and such. I don't believe that any round in its class gives a tremendous advantage over any other. The case could be made that the 7mm/08 has a shorter case, hence the possibility of a compressed load, hence more even ignition for a more consistent shot-by-shot accuracy than some, but in the realm of reality, the bore of the rifle, the concentricity of the chamber to the bore, even lug pressure and a host of other mechanical issues come into play as much as the actual shape of the case. The most important factor is the experience of the rifleman and the confidence the shooter has in his weapon. A guy with a minute and a half, say .284 (an obsolescent caliber) that has used only that rifle for years and is carefully practiced with it will be far more deadly than a guy with the latest, greatest 27 cal or 7 mm round in a 1/2 minute rifle who has no experience with the rig or no confidence with the rig. If you want the best 7mm/08 ever made, find a good one and shoot it every chance you get at everything you can. I've got a vintage Austrian made 30/06 that can only reliably shoot at 1.5 MOA. It seldom misses because I've used it almost exclusively for 30 years. It knows to wobble when I wibble and vise versa. I'm going to a 270 this season, but I'm pretty confident in it and have enough experience to know that a reasonably accurate rifle zeroed correctly will hit the target if I do my part. So in the long run, the more you shoot, the more accurate your rifle becomes. Shoot it often and keep it clean and you'll fear few shots.
Yes but what about the guy that is equally familiar with his .5 moa gun? Accurate rifles build confidence and teach you to trust the gun. They allow for more precise zeroes, meaning that if I set my gun to hit 1 inch high at 100, it actually hits there. No guessing where the center of the group is, or where the next shot might land and calling it good just because the center of the last 3 shot group was an inch high. How does one set a 1.5 inch gun to shoot 1 inch high anyway? Think about it. A couple of 3 shot groups is not a large enough sample to offer a conclusive and definitive zero if the gun won't group smaller than the margin for error...which depends on how far you plan on shooting. If in the woods, I agree...but if presented a 400-500 yard shot, your gun is only capable of holding 6-7.5 inches PLUS the error in sighting in. That's the BEST you can do, consistently with a 1.5 moa gun with ZERO sight in error. That's not to mention shooter error, wind, and accurately ranging the deer. With a .5 moa gun, the sight in error is 3 times less, PLUS the gun itself is capable of shooting 3 times smaller, greatly increasing the shooter's margin for error. Again, if hunting in the woods or keeping shots to distances that you and the GUN are proficient at it doesn't matter, but if you or anyone else can't see the value of a more accurate rifle at distance, I can't help it. My woods gun is a 30-30. It's the only gun I own that won't shoot under 1moa. I don't take it to the field blinds.
In the words of Col. Townsend Whelen---"Only accurate guns are interesting." I love accurate rifles!
 

scsims

10 pointer
Oct 14, 2003
1,786
Mercer/Washington County
Yes but what about the guy that is equally familiar with his .5 moa gun? Accurate rifles build confidence and teach you to trust the gun. They allow for more precise zeroes, meaning that if I set my gun to hit 1 inch high at 100, it actually hits there. No guessing where the center of the group is, or where the next shot might land and calling it good just because the center of the last 3 shot group was an inch high. How does one set a 1.5 inch gun to shoot 1 inch high anyway? Think about it. A couple of 3 shot groups is not a large enough sample to offer a conclusive and definitive zero if the gun won't group smaller than the margin for error...which depends on how far you plan on shooting. If in the woods, I agree...but if presented a 400-500 yard shot, your gun is only capable of holding 6-7.5 inches PLUS the error in sighting in. That's the BEST you can do, consistently with a 1.5 moa gun with ZERO sight in error. That's not to mention shooter error, wind, and accurately ranging the deer. With a .5 moa gun, the sight in error is 3 times less, PLUS the gun itself is capable of shooting 3 times smaller, greatly increasing the shooter's margin for error. Again, if hunting in the woods or keeping shots to distances that you and the GUN are proficient at it doesn't matter, but if you or anyone else can't see the value of a more accurate rifle at distance, I can't help it. My woods gun is a 30-30. It's the only gun I own that won't shoot under 1moa. I don't take it to the field blinds.
In the words of Col. Townsend Whelen---"Only accurate guns are interesting." I love accurate rifles!

Well said....... this acticle speaks to the same idea. Accuracy is a very fiuld concept, what one mans thinks it accurate is almost always different from another. Consistantly accurate now that's......... oops I may have just opened up a big can of worms. Most people measure a rifles ability by the smallest group it's ever shot, while others measure it's accuracy by the largest group it's ever shot..... think about that for a moment.

I hope I don't get dinged for posting an article from another forum.

http://www.longrangehunting.com/articles/degrees-rifle-accuracy-1.php
 

mwezell

12 pointer
Jan 22, 2006
4,110
Auburn, KY
Well said....... this acticle speaks to the same idea. Accuracy is a very fiuld concept, what one mans thinks it accurate is almost always different from another. Consistantly accurate now that's......... oops I may have just opened up a big can of worms. Most people measure a rifles ability by the smallest group it's ever shot, while others measure it's accuracy by the largest group it's ever shot..... think about that for a moment.

I hope I don't get dinged for posting an article from another forum.

http://www.longrangehunting.com/articles/degrees-rifle-accuracy-1.php
Good point Scott! To me a guns accuracy is what it does every time...all day, every day..averaged, without discounting fliers. They count, but "wallet" groups don't mean a thing to me unless you can sit down at any given time and repeat them...no excuses. THAT is when great shooting guns and capable shooters meet.
 

ptbrauch

12 pointer
Nov 10, 2004
11,024
The OC
Well said....... this acticle speaks to the same idea. Accuracy is a very fiuld concept, what one mans thinks it accurate is almost always different from another. Consistantly accurate now that's......... oops I may have just opened up a big can of worms. Most people measure a rifles ability by the smallest group it's ever shot, while others measure it's accuracy by the largest group it's ever shot..... think about that for a moment.

I hope I don't get dinged for posting an article from another forum.

http://www.longrangehunting.com/articles/degrees-rifle-accuracy-1.php

That is interesting. That's probably going to make me think when I read articles on guns that the authors claim to shoot extremely accurate. I guess because in my career I'm always looking at data and looking for trends, not the best at a single moment in time, that I never considered that some would claim the best they ever shot one time as the standard for their rifle.
 

mwezell

12 pointer
Jan 22, 2006
4,110
Auburn, KY
That is interesting. That's probably going to make me think when I read articles on guns that the authors claim to shoot extremely accurate. I guess because in my career I'm always looking at data and looking for trends, not the best at a single moment in time, that I never considered that some would claim the best they ever shot one time as the standard for their rifle.

Happens all the time.:confused:
 

scsims

10 pointer
Oct 14, 2003
1,786
Mercer/Washington County
That is interesting. That's probably going to make me think when I read articles on guns that the authors claim to shoot extremely accurate. I guess because in my career I'm always looking at data and looking for trends, not the best at a single moment in time, that I never considered that some would claim the best they ever shot one time as the standard for their rifle.

I think you would find that a lot of people do...... One of the most used phrases to look for about someone claiming exceptional accuracy from themselves or their rifles is. "All day long" please beware. I believe I may have said that a time or two when I was first getting into reloading.

Someone claiming that they can shoot .5" all day long is most likely an exageration. And when you hear the 1/4" group all day long phrase uttered please do yourself a favor and just disregard that claim. Rule of thumb for me if I truely want to know what I'm capable of shooting with a particular rifle/load combo is 5 - 5 shot groups measured end to end and then substract the bullets diameter. With that said I rarely shoot 5 - 5 shot groups anymore.... I feel I'm waisting time and money. I get a few good tight 3 shot groups and then start stretching the distance to see how it performs further out.
 

1wildcatfan

12 pointer
Jan 2, 2009
15,010
raised n Bullitt Co.
Thanks Loomis! I will have to look the next time I am in the local Wal-mart and see if they carry them. Wildcat I understand what your saying but here is the problem I fear myself running into... Say I go out West or somewhere else to hunt and forget ammo... What am I going to do then? This is one reason why I want a .308 for my next rifle.

i make a check list on every hunt i go on and start it several weeks in advance; (most important things first) toilet paper, rifle, ammo, bipod/shooting sticks, clothes, boots, knives, gps, batteries, headlight, etc. i always take two boxes of ammo and pack them in different bags in case one bag is lost/delayed. i'm smiling when i say this:), but if i go on a hunt and forget ammo, i probably don't have any business going on that hunt in the first place. i think your fears are unfounded unless you're a last minute kind of person.
 


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