2500 Ram vs 2500 Silverado

Discussion in 'Community Forum' started by Lady Hunter, Jul 11, 2021.

  1. timer

    timer 10 pointer

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    Feb 20, 2013
    La Grange
    If you are pulling heavy loads for long distances, I'd go with the diesel. What you are describing doesn't sound heavy to me (you may know better) - so I believe you'd be fine with gas. I'm also a Ford truck guy, but I have friends who have both Chevys (GMCs, actually) and Rams and they each swear by their truck brand.

    I don't know a lot about transmissions, but the gear ratio is where it's at with regard to pulling vs. gas mileage. I'd love to have a diesel, but I just can't justify the extra cost and I've never had any issues with my 2004 F-150 that has a gas engine and a transmission that is geared for pulling vs. gas mileage. My gas mileage in this truck is not good - 14-15 mpg on a good day. But I only drive it about 3500-4000 miles per year and most of the time I'm pulling a gooseneck with calves or rolls of hay. I've never hooked this little truck to a load of calves or rolls of hay (16 ft trailers) where there has been any debate about whether or not it would pull them. Now, most of my miles are in Mercer and Boyle counties - not a lot of hills - but I've pulled loads of calves through Casey county to the Russell county stockyards and never had any issues. If I had bought a truck for gas mileage, I'm sure it wouldn't pull as well.

    I agree with the premise that is called out in several of the threads above. There are advantages and disadvantages to each brand and you have to look at what the truck offers vs. what you want vs. what you really need vs. what you want to spend in order to make a good decision.

    Hope to see you on the open road in a few years!
     
  2. Mt Pokt

    Mt Pokt 8 pointer

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    Nov 8, 2018
    Campbell County
    I had a 2016 Silverado HD w/ 4 doors, 8' bed and 4wd w/ the gas engine. Pulled great, drove nice, etc... The best empty highway mileage it got was 18mpg if I recall. The diesel averages 23 with a best 25 mile record of 30.7! My average work to home and home to work was 17 in the gas and 22 in the diesel.

    The math I used when considering a diesel.
    If, the diesel gets 20% better mileage which isn't uncommon it's going to use 20% less fuel, right?
    For every 100 gallons of gas, you'll use 80 gallons of diesel.
    If gas is $3 per gallon, that's $300. If diesel is $3 per gallon that's $240.
    If you drive 20k miles per year:
    Gas @ 17mpg = 1,176 gallons for a total of $3,528
    Diesel @ 20.4 mpg = 980 gallons for a total of $2,940
    $588 savings X 5 years = $2,940

    The equalizer is the cost of fuel and the actual mileage comparison.
    2018 Premium Gasoline average $3.294 per gallon
    2018 Highway Diesel average $3.178 per gallon ($0.116 per gallon less than premium gas)
    2019 Premium Gasoline Average $3.251 per gallon
    2019 Highway Diesel average $3.056 per gallon ($0.195 per gallon less than premium gas)
    2020 Premium Gasoline average $2.834 per gallon
    2020 Highway Diesel average $2.551 per gallon ($0.283 per gallon less than premium gas)

    Figure the fuel costs into the above math, and figure the retained value for a diesel and the diesel is the winner even if you're not using the power for towing/hauling.

    Turns out in my case that the Duramax is getting about 45% better fuel economy than the 6.0 gas engine.

    Towing the same trailer in the gas dropped the mileage down to single digits versus still 15-17 in the diesel.

    BUT - That's just my experience with GM/Chevy. I have no idea how the Ram or Ford diesel versus gas in the same model compare.
     
  3. 1wildcatfan

    1wildcatfan 12 pointer

    12,364
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    raised n Bullitt Co.
    Back in the early 1990s when the Cummins came out, I did the same rithmatic. I figured it'd take 100,000 miles to break even at the prices back in 94. Diesel was $1.30.
     
  4. riverboss

    riverboss 12 pointer

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    Jan 26, 2009
    northern ky
    figure in the filters and oil changes and plugging them in in the winter plus deff and see what you come up with, I'm sure that will put them even if not make the diesel more expensive.
     
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  5. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

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    Nov 16, 2013
    Northern Kentucky
    Diesel are more expensive for sure but you get what you pay for. Literally everything is more costly…..but the added longevity, reliability, ease of towing and overall performance are worth the money in my opinion.
     
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  6. EdLongshanks

    EdLongshanks 12 pointer

    15,818
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    Nov 16, 2013
    Northern Kentucky
    A deleted Ford 6.7 is a champion
     
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  7. LuckyMan

    LuckyMan 6 pointer

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    Apr 29, 2018
    Winchester
    I have my Chevy Diesel serviced every 5K miles and the oil changes are $88.00 at the dealership I bought it at. I know that every 5K miles in a diesel is overkill but that is required by the dealer to maintain the lifetime power train warranty. I have to replace the fuel filter every 15K miles and it costs me $150. The DEF usage depends on how much I’m towing. I can fill it up and haul a loaded 16’ trailer to Wyoming and 1/2 way back before I have to add any. If I’m just grocery getting with it for a while I don’t have to add any DEF for at least 2 oil changes. The “added” cost of owning a diesel which is not that much after the initial purchase far outweighs the the gas usage of the last 6.0 that I had. The 6.0 was bullet proof and had all the torque you will ever need but once you go diesel you’ll never go back. No comparison when you are hauling long distance.
     
  8. Brody

    Brody 10 pointer

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    Apr 7, 2019
    No place like home
    I've got a 6.0 F250, 310,000 m.
    Towing and long hauls there is no comparison. Been a very good truck.
     
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  9. baknblack

    baknblack 10 pointer

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    Henry County
    Chevy got rid of the cp4 starting in 17. They now use a Denso pump and injection system. I'm pretty sure the new fords are using the cp4 as well. I don't think the failure rate is really high but, if you are out of warranty and it goes expect a 10k repair bill.
     
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  10. Tankt

    Tankt 12 pointer

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    Dec 26, 2019
    Kentucky
    This is what scares me
     
  11. cityslicker

    cityslicker 8 pointer

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    Jan 11, 2010
    Hart county
    I've decided if I ever need a tow rig it will probably be an OBS Ford with the 7.3 powerstroke or a 12 valve Cummins swapped in it. My second choice would be a 06-07 Chevy Duramax. I don't want a diesel with all the smog crap or have to use def fluid. I don't need all the bells and whistles that make new trucks so expensive. The only modern feature I would add would be a back up camera.
     
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  12. CRFmxracer

    CRFmxracer 12 pointer

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    louisville kentucky
    From what I hear, the failure is due to bad fuel or starving the injection pump of fuel running a tune
     
  13. Lady Hunter

    Lady Hunter 12 pointer

    4,066
    3,989
    Jan 12, 2009
    Don't know when it'll make it here but we ordered a 2022 Ram 2500 Tradesman Crew Cab with a gas engine a couple weeks ago. Deciding factors were:

    a) Hubby has flat out loved his 2000 Ram & just couldn't stomach switching to either Ford or Chevy.

    b) We won't be hauling "hell bent for glory" any more like we did back in the day. Long trips cross country will be at a more leisurely pace. No more racing sports cars up the Continental Divide while pulling a 26' trailer behind us.

    c) The cost of diesel (both engine & fuel) vs the amount of time it would take us to "break even." As best we could calculate, we'd both be so old by then that it wouldn't matter 'cause we wouldn't be going very far - IF we were still driving at all.

    d) When we roll out, we'll just be hauling the slide in truck camper. It's a big one (hence the need for an 8' bed) but still a lot lighter than the 5th wheel & Airstream we used to travel with.

    We added a few extras on but not many. Cloth seats. Spray in Bedliner. Trailer Brake Controller. All the doo-dads in the Level 2 Equipment and Safety packages. Blasted thing is gonna cost more than our house did & still not have all the bells & whistles our old truck had!!!!!!!

    Once it gets here, we'll have to put side steps on it for me so I can climb in and find some place to install the tie down anchors for the camper. I'm also researching bed covers that we can use when we're not camping - want something solid that we can lock but that will be easy to remove when we go to put the camper on.

    Gonna suck to be in debt again but my goal is to get it paid off somehow by the time hubby retires. We may be eating a lot of soup beans & cornbread this winter! lol!
     
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  14. rcb216

    rcb216 12 pointer

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    Sep 25, 2005
    Robertson Co.
    Nuthing wrong with soup beans and cornbread. Lol. You did your research and got what you wanted for the most part. Sucks to be in debt but you needed a truck so hope it turns out to be a good one. Post some pics when you get it!!
     
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  15. 1wildcatfan

    1wildcatfan 12 pointer

    12,364
    10,392
    Jan 2, 2009
    raised n Bullitt Co.
    Congrats. Sure you'll enjoy it. Delivery date?
     

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