kind of depressing

Discussion in 'Habitat Improvement' started by ojibwa62, Mar 16, 2019.

  1. ojibwa62

    ojibwa62 12 pointer

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    Jul 1, 2018
    N.O.T.W
    This subforum should be jumping , most guys on here hunt and many own or lease land and yet the habitat improvement forum is practically dead.. We shouldn't be just takers from the land but also givers..
     
    Genesis 27:3 likes this.
  2. Bubbles

    Bubbles 8 pointer

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    Oct 25, 2016
    I have already sown my clover. Only.thing left for me is to mow and replant wheat and brassicas in the fall
     
    carnivore likes this.
  3. ojibwa62

    ojibwa62 12 pointer

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    I would like to see more habitat improvement discussions..
     
  4. KY Swamp Beagler

    KY Swamp Beagler 12 pointer

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    Feb 20, 2011
    the swamps of western KY
    You mean like building brush piles for small game and song birds?:)
     
    Nock and Marsh CallUser like this.
  5. ojibwa62

    ojibwa62 12 pointer

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    Sure lol and bluebird boxes, wood duck boxes, hinging, TSI, planting trees (all kinds) planting more perenials , would like to see more talk on crimping and seed drills, other DIY habitat projects etc etc etc we should put back twice what we take.
     
  6. rlb165

    rlb165 10 pointer

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    Here’s my top secret ultimate food plot seed:
    B585EEF0-247F-49BE-8132-5D6248DB4DDB.jpeg
     
    barney and ojibwa62 like this.
  7. ojibwa62

    ojibwa62 12 pointer

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    Used to have a buddy who managed a grocery store , he used to give me all the out of date and busted bags of dry beans and I would plant them
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019
    rlb165 likes this.
  8. davers

    davers 12 pointer

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    Jul 14, 2014
    Kentucky
    Around two years ago, on another hunting forum, I wrote a blog concerning purchasing & management of hunting property. There were numerous members seeking advice on that particular subject, so I wrote it to aid them. Hope it fits this Sub-forum.:

    OWNING AND MANAGING HUNTING PROPERTY
    Published by Davers in the blog Davers's blog.

    At some point in time, many avid Hunters express a desire to own property for hunting. The fact remains that good hunting property is becoming very hard to obtain or even to lease, this prompts one into considering purchasing their own property. Purchasing property is especially important to those living in urban areas where hunting can be both challenging and costly, especially if they must lease or find private property in which to enjoy the sport of hunting, otherwise they must hunt on over-crowded public hunting areas. Purchasing hunting property can be either difficult or easily accomplished depending on one’s needs and circumstances. Some hunting property is excellent, which commands a high price, and then we have other types that are good with some being fair, which will require some degree of management to improve them. Another factor when choosing property for hunting is location and what other type properties surround it, as one does not want to buy a piece of land and later find out that surrounding properties are about to be developed into housing or shopping centers. The "age old adage" of real estate “Location-Location-Location”applies to rural property just like it does to urban property. So one should carefully do their homework when choosing to purchasing hunting property making certain this prospective purchase suits their hunting needs, as well as the amount they are willing to spend in terms: of money and the amount of improvement one is willing to invest.

    Okay, let us say that our Hunter has found land which fills the requirements sought. Remember, there are varying types of hunting property with equally varying prices. If our Hunter is fortunate enough and finds property, once owned by another Hunter, we can assume that most of the requirement for a healthy wildlife population being both game and non-game is, for the most, in place. However, such property is and expensive to obtain or even impossible to find. So the next best choice is finding land that is almost as good sustaining a healthy environment for preferred game species the Hunter is interested in maintaining. This is most likely fits the description of the average condition of hunting property being purchased, and will require some additional modification to bring it into the same status as a piece of prime hunting ground. Remember, I said there are varying types of property that just because they are in a rural area; one must be careful to avoid property that has been extensively strip-mined, as such land, while might seem like a great bargain, it will be costly to improve it and will take many years to turn it into good hunting property. If this is the case then our Hunter will spend more time and money in making improvements rather than quality time spent hunting the property.

    Getting back to the Hunter, who wisely chose hunting property; one needs to actually do more research on the land to see if anything can be “tweaked” or just improved a bit. First determine what game animals are preferred and what existing food source is available naturally. The four important requirements for a healthy wildlife population are: sheltered areas, year-round available food sources, minerals, and water. Say the Hunter is interested in maintaining a healthy Whitetail Deer population and maybe another species of wildlife that is hunted like Squirrels and Rabbits. If the property is such that a large portion is wooded and was “logged” several years prior to the purchase then there should be enough under story to provide natural browse for Deer, plus areas in which to hide. If said property has not been logged or maintained, then the new owner can have it logged, by a trusted lumber company, which will carefully remove only competing trees. The extra money from the sale of lumber will come in handy in making other improvements of the property if needed. Our Hunter should check the property to see what plant varieties Deer are browsing on as this will give clue to which natural growing vegetation is preferred and what other vegetation need to be controlled or eliminated.

    Now let us discuss “food plots” as this is a very popular addition to any hunting property. In order to properly establish a healthy food plot, one must do the following:

    1. Determine if the soil type is correct for the type of crop being planted. One should have a soil test to determine pH levels as well as a complete soil analysis as it might need amending. Then one will need to eliminate existing weeds and such and prepare the area for the food plot, by spraying and working the soil for planting.

    2. The size of the food plot is important as if it is too small it will do little good. Food plots should be large enough to provide food year round, and planted with the correct type of crop for the area. Preferable, a perennial type of many grass varieties are excellent for this. The area Agriculture Agent or Habitat Biologist can assist if necessary.

    3. Avoid crops like soybeans or other type grains that require replanting each year. While these are fine and many plant these in their food plots, they also run-up the cost of food plots and require extra work.

    After everything has been done to his or her satisfaction; it should take just a few years to really get things going to where one will have their own hunting property for them to use and enjoy.
     
    timer, rlb165 and ojibwa62 like this.
  9. DH13

    DH13 12 pointer

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    Jan 13, 2012
    Shelby county
    I sowed some food plots about a week ago. Been doing some brush pile work and cleaning up a lot of brush and down trees. Been to muddy to do much. When it dries up where I can get tractor back going to do some mowing and hinge cutting plus a bunch of big brush pile work.
     
    carnivore and davers like this.
  10. davers

    davers 12 pointer

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    Jul 14, 2014
    Kentucky
    This past winter weather was not too friendly for outdoor work, at least in my area. I did do some mowing about a month ago when the weather allowed. Got some brush piles from pine limbs broken by heavy snow & ice. I usually mow twice per year, once in late Winter, and again in mid-July. This allows for some fresh vegetation growth for Deer, Turkey, and other wildlife species.
     
  11. ojibwa62

    ojibwa62 12 pointer

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    Jul 1, 2018
    N.O.T.W
    I am ready to get some plots in but worried about a late freeze..
     
    davers likes this.
  12. carnivore

    carnivore 12 pointer

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    Nov 17, 2007
    Ky
    I was able to overseed my ww with clover yesterday. I had to use a handheld broadcaster rather than my tractor. Hell of a workout lol. My grounds are a sloppy mess but we are going to get some frosts at night this week. I over seeded fescue around my house in the places that needed it as well.
     
    davers and ojibwa62 like this.
  13. rlb165

    rlb165 10 pointer

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    Dec 10, 2001
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    If the wind lays down, I’m going to burn this little strip between a food plot and our driveway.
    BF5432CB-03A5-4CBB-9AE8-1E28BEB9E9D6.jpeg
     
    davers, Nock and ojibwa62 like this.
  14. Nock

    Nock 12 pointer

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    Sep 9, 2012
    butler co
    Past few weeks I’ve FS clover. Done some burning. Cut and piled some brush piles and done some bush hogging. And getting some bee stuff together.
     
    davers likes this.
  15. davers

    davers 12 pointer

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    Jul 14, 2014
    Kentucky
    I also hope we don't have any surprise "May" freezes. I always concerned about these late freezes, or rainy weather, as the it could zap this years' acorn & hickory crop.
     
    ojibwa62 and Ataulbe1 like this.

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