First Ever Garden

Discussion in 'Community Forum' started by jtcain02, Apr 16, 2019 at 12:10 PM.

  1. jtcain02

    jtcain02 6 pointer

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    Aug 20, 2011
    Alright guys, I've let the wife talk me into planting a garden at the house this year. I have done several food plots and planted for waterfowl but never done vegetables for myself. Any help with this endeaveor would be greatly appreciated. Do you fertilize like a food plot? What about weeds?
     
  2. ojibwa62

    ojibwa62 12 pointer

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    All I can say is it's a ton of work spraying, weeding , muching etc etc nothing like a food plot. Is it worth it? yep fresh veggies are way better the anything you will find in any store. But it is a lot of work and don't let anyone tell you different.
     
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  3. Carl

    Carl 12 pointer

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    Weeds are your worst enemy.
     
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  4. jtcain02

    jtcain02 6 pointer

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    Could you spray it with round-up prior to tilling? Would that help with weeds?
     
  5. ojibwa62

    ojibwa62 12 pointer

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    yes, that will kill what is there, but there are still going to be weeds just get a good hoe and work it daily.
     
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  6. jtcain02

    jtcain02 6 pointer

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    Do you guys use fertilizer prior to planting? During?
     
  7. Ataulbe1

    Ataulbe1 8 pointer

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    I till in compost prior to planting. Usually will throw down some more on heavy feeders like corn and tomatoes through the growing season.

    I've used 10-10-10 a couple times, but if you're doing a small plot over the years compost will improve your soil. Fertilizer wont. Also depends on how organic you're trying to go. Some people want no chemicals or fertilizer, some dont care.
     
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  8. Ataulbe1

    Ataulbe1 8 pointer

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    ^^^THIS
     
  9. Feedman

    Feedman Cyber-Hunter

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    How d
    How do you figure that fertilizer does not improve your soil?
     
  10. Ataulbe1

    Ataulbe1 8 pointer

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    "Synthetic fertilizers give plants a quick boost but do little to improve soil texture, stimulate soil life, or improve your soil's long-term fertility."

    "For the long-term health of your garden, feeding your plants by building the soil with organic fertilizers and compost is best. This will give you soil that is rich in organic matter and teeming with microbial life."

    https://www.gardeners.com/how-to/fertilizer-ratios/5161.html
     
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  11. RVtech24

    RVtech24 12 pointer

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    For a small garden all you need to do is pile up leaves and the oldest hay that you can find. You don't even have to till up the ground, just pile up the hay and leaves so thick that it kills the grass and keeps weeds from coming up through the mulch. In a few years you will have a garden that is so rich in microbes and goodies that plants need to survive on. Using fertilizer kills everything that a plant needs to survive on naturally. Every fall I collect and pile up all the leaves and old hay that I find in a pile 2 or 3 feet deep, over the winter it will all break down into a rich black mat. In the spring all you have to do is pull back the mulch, plant your plants and spread the mulch back around the plants and set back and watch them grow. Weeds cannot grow through the thick mat of mulch and you don't have to water as often because the mulch keeps the ground from drying out. Believe me it works great... I did it for 30 years until my wife started planting flowers in my garden. Now all I plant is a few tomato plants and bell peppers.
     
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  12. FOWLER2671

    FOWLER2671 12 pointer

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    Evicted from Aintry'
    If you don't have the equipment for tilling or the build up of leaves etc, Black plastic is your friend Lay out the plastic for a week to kill the grass. Pull it half way back and lay out spots for each plant. Dig the hole and add soil improvements(Good compost ) Make a mound about 6 inches across and two inches high then surrounding ground . Dig/form those mounds then put black plastic back down. Weight it around the side to hold it down. Cut an X in the plastic on each mound and plant through the plastic. It will eliminate weeds, conserve moisture and draw worms as well as warming the soil.
     
  13. barney

    barney 12 pointer

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    One of the healthiest fields on this farm is an old tobacco field that was cropped yearly from the 1940's to 2003. It was cover cropped with wheat every fall after harvest, and turned under every spring that I remember, but that ground has had more tons of chemical fertilizers put on it than any I know of.

    I also have a friend who has a PhD in plant biology. He did genetic work on paste tomatoes in Colorado for years before doing breeding work in tobacco for F.W. Rickard seed Co, he also raises organic vegetables for the challenge. We have talked a lot about growing veggies over the years. He confirmed to me what I already knew, fruiting plants like maters and peppers can't be farmed profitability with organic methods. Leafy greens, lettuce, and perennials like asparagus can be. He also confirmed to me another thing that I discovered during my journey of gardening over the years. Well fed plants, organic or chemical, produce better flavored fruits, and have better nutrition than hungry, organically grown vegetables.
     
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  14. jtcain02

    jtcain02 6 pointer

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    Aug 20, 2011
    I have the equipment to till the garden so that will probably be the route that I go. Thank you all for your insight. Lots of great knowledge on this forum!
     

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