Custom Blend Food Plot Seed

Discussion in 'Habitat Improvement' started by KyHillyBilly, Mar 5, 2017.

  1. KyHillyBilly

    KyHillyBilly 6 pointer

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    Nov 25, 2013
    I'm trying to cover all three growing seasons with one seed mix. Spring, Summer, and Fall.

    For the spring growing season, and help keep the weeds down at first, I'm throwing oats into the mix. Problem is I don't know which variety for spring planting. Jerry or bob oats? Other variety?

    Next part of the mix is the clovers. I'm definitely going to use some type of white clover, at the current moment, I'm leaning towards Seminole ladino(but more research needs to be done). This is where again I run into a problem. Do I use crimson clover to help fill in the gap between the oats and when the ladino clover takes hold or use chicory.

    The next part is to cover the fall and after the first frost, is some purple top turnip.

    To sum it all up, which type of oats for spring planting. And Crimson or chicory? Both?

    Or another alternative?
     
  2. Blackdog85

    Blackdog85 Fawn

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    Oct 28, 2014
    Ogle oats for spring
     
  3. useyourbow

    useyourbow 12 pointer

    All of my investigating is coming up Buck Wheat and no not the little rascal. They say it is great for the soil but used as a cover crop and not necessarily a companion plot. They say you can plant it in the spring, the deer will hammer it, it will mature in 100 days and then begin to die off. If you don't want to disk again, they say you can broadcast your fall blend over the standing buck wheat and then either mow or run over the buck wheat and the fall plantings will grow up from underneath. Anyway the Buck Wheat really fends off/blocks out the weeds.
     
  4. skin_dog1

    skin_dog1 BBBC Members

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    Jan 2, 2004
    Alvaton, KY, USA.
    Is this something you're planting now? Or is this 3 separate plantings? You don't want to plant turnips in the spring for a fall food plot. I think the best way to accomplish what you're trying to do is with a fall planted blend. A mix of ptt, daikon radish, wheat or oats, crimson and ladino clover. Don't get hung up on varieties, you nor the deer will know the difference. Keep the brassica part of the blend light, 1# PTT, 4#daikon. They grow fast and canopy out preventing the other parts of the blend from coming in. The biggest mistake I see with brassicas is planting too thick.
     
  5. K9trapper

    K9trapper 12 pointer

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    Dec 7, 2006
    The previous poster is correct, Ogle oats for spring. If clover is sewn at the same time, you'll have a nice stand of clover by July. Then you would mow the tops off the oats. If you want to cover winter feeding, add rye, not ryegrass, in late September. That will give you something green throughout the winter until the clover starts again.

    I'd have separate plots if I tried to add any brassica mix.
     
  6. slicked-it

    slicked-it 8 pointer

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    Oct 20, 2008
    K9 is helping me implement the exact plan mentioned in his post. This past Sunday we applied 100lbs of 6-24-24 and sowed oats and ladino clover. We used a disc to prepare the soil and ran the cultipacker over it once the seeds were sown. If I think about it, I'll take and post pics of our work and progress. Really excited to see this process through. It's an awesome feeling to have a plan that is designed to fit the needs of my soils and wildlife goals. Every step we've taken was based off soil samples and proven science. No more "throw & grow" for this guy!!
     

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  7. KyHillyBilly

    KyHillyBilly 6 pointer

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    Nov 25, 2013
    Thanks for all the replies. Looks like we are gonna go with some oagle oats and some ladino cover.

    And then use K9Trappers advice and use brassicas in other fall specific plot.
     
  8. rlb165

    rlb165 8 pointer

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    Slicked-it, if you don't mind me asking, what issues have you had with throw & grow? I'm kind of on the fence about it.
    I tried it for the first time last year. It started off great, but then the drought hit and it stopped growing. I don't know if conventionally planted food plots would've held up any better or not.
     
  9. slicked-it

    slicked-it 8 pointer

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    Oct 20, 2008
    As it has been explained to me (K9, skin and some of the more educated guys can chime in here), the throw and grow mixes have a variety of stuff and some of it will grow on a rock and come up quick, only to produce marginal results later down the road when it's tested by weather conditions, browse etc. In my opinion (like so much other stuff in the "hunting industry") some of that stuff is a gimmick....put a "pro-hunter" or a giant deer on the bag and sell the crap out of it at Wal-Mart.

    K9 tailored a plan to fit the specific needs of both my fields AND the crop we are trying to grow. Up until this year I've never really had access to equipment and that makes it hard. Coupling the new equipment with the plan and I have very high expectations for these 3 plots. I understand that there are many factors at play here, but never before have I had a "plan" and executed it to this degree.

    I look at it like this................farmers don't just throw their seed on the ground and hope for the best so why should we?? There is a lot of science involved and a specific method to their madness. I got tired of getting minimal results and decided to go all in.....a "reap what you sow" kind of mindset.

    our steps.....
    1. measured all three fields for exact acreage so we know how much seed, fertilizer, spray etc.
    2. pulled soil samples in February and reviewed the results to discuss deficiencies and needs of the land....this kind of drove the "what to plant" discussion.
    3. Establish a timeline and plan for each field, based on what we decided to plant.
    4. field preparation according to the plan - so in my clover plot (the field in the pic), we've already broke the ground, fertilized and sowed oats and clover and ran over it with the cultipacker. The other two fields have been limed and we are waiting to break and plant because they are different crops.

    Definitely more work but it's been fun. I knew very little going into this but I've been taking good notes and asking a lot of questions. I would highly recommend working with someone in the know if time and money allow. It may seem like a little more up front (time, work and money) but in my opinion, it's worth it because it takes the guesswork out of it.

    Sorry for the long winded reply...........as you can see I'm excited to share what I've learned. K9, Skindog..........please step in and correct anything I've relayed incorrectly. I'm not a biologist...........I just stayed at a Holiday Inn last night ;)
     
  10. rlb165

    rlb165 8 pointer

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    Thanks for replying. I have a confession: Even though you specifically said "throw & grow", and I specifically responded "throw & grow", I was actually thinking about a technique that's called....
    "Throw & MOW". It's something I read about on the old QDMA Forum.
    In a nutshell, you THROW your seed into tall vegetation, then MOW the vegetation down to cover the seed. With a little moisture, the seed thinks it's in dirt and germinates. Some guys call it a "poor man's food plot". THAT'S what I did last year, and what I thought you were saying you didn't want any more of. My bad. I've never fooled with any of the throw & grow mixes, for the same reasons that you gave.

    It sounds like you and K9 have got it goin' on! I hope you post up some pictures with some green in your plots before too long.
    Good luck!
     
  11. KyHillyBilly

    KyHillyBilly 6 pointer

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    Nov 25, 2013
    I'm tinkering around with doing a "throw and mow" plot. Here's what I'm working with:

    Shepps.Field2.jpg
    Sorry for the black face;confidentiality type stuff.

    We don't have the tools to tiller' up, but we do have lawn mowers and weed eaters.

    Do you think it's worthy of giving it the ol'college try?
     
  12. KyHillyBilly

    KyHillyBilly 6 pointer

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    Nov 25, 2013
    Most of the grass in the field is mostly this clumpy stuff:
    Shepps.Field3.jpg
     
  13. useyourbow

    useyourbow 12 pointer

    KYHILLBILLY
    From my limited knowledge and research the "The Throw and Mow" tactic is usually done on previously planted fields like broadcasting a fall plot over a spring planting not overgrown weed fields. I would think the existing grasses and weeds would truly hamper germination and growth if not tilled. You could probably rent a large rototiller to do a plot of that size. Mowing and string trimming this time a year would probably promote growth rather than suppress it. Again this is only my $0.02 but a plot that small would be better served as a kill plot so focus on prepping (spraying and tilling) now and over the summer and then plant for the fall. Additionally planting spring plots of clovers and such requires mowing, combating weeds, and maintenance while fall plots have less problems with weeds.
     
  14. rlb165

    rlb165 8 pointer

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    KyHillyBilly, are you in like a Witness Protection Program or something? Hats off to you for attempting to improve your wildlife habitat, even while on the run.. :D
     
  15. rlb165

    rlb165 8 pointer

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    Dec 10, 2001
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    View attachment 56688
    This is what my clover looked like when it was coming up through the thatch. I had about the same amount of grass that you show in your pic.
     

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