Oneida Eagle Bows

Discussion in 'Archery Equipment' started by Jman, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. Jman

    Jman 8 pointer

    543
    0
    Feb 14, 2003
    I kind of have some interest in acquiring an Oneida bow for something to hobby with. Anyone on here know how easy/dificult they are to tune?.....adjust draw length or weight? I have my own press and numerous other compounds, so I'm not afraid to work on bows by any means. But, I have never so much as held one of the Oneida bows with all the cables, pulleys and such. From the appearance, I think I prefer the Strike Eagle or Screaming Eagle. Not real sure of the difference in the models. Any advice appreciated.
     
  2. headoftheholler

    headoftheholler 12 pointer

    3,177
    0
    Oct 16, 2007
    Getshot, KY
    I owned a Strike Eagle, bought it for $50 and put newer accessories on it, got it to shoot great, a few robinhoods in fact. Very easy to tune once you learn how, there are Oneida exclusive boards that can help you get started. Careful pressing them though, they dont press like a normal bow and you can damage them bad. Smooth as butter draw but you will spend a fortune making it quiet. When I went to get rid of mine to upgrade to a new Mathews the local bow shop offered me $50. I looked them up on ebay and long story short sold it for $250 there. Apparently the old Oneidas are all the rage for the bowfishing crowd.
     
  3. Jman

    Jman 8 pointer

    543
    0
    Feb 14, 2003
    I'm finding the same thing (high resale) on the older bows. I wondered what had the prices on them so high. Maybe it is bowfishing driving it. I'll check for sites as you suggested.Thank you for the response.
     
  4. dxtsniper

    dxtsniper 12 pointer

    2,880
    0
    Nov 7, 2009
    Turn around!
  5. quackrstackr

    quackrstackr Welcome to Fantasy Island Staff Member

    24,084
    0
    Nov 19, 2003
    The Island
    Yup.. the bowfishing diehards are all about the Oneidas. They pay huge money for them.
     
  6. ribsplitter

    ribsplitter Cyber-Hunter

    1,902
    0
    Jan 19, 2004
    rush, ky, USA.
    I used to shoot a screaming eagle it was honestly one of the best shooting bows I've ever picked up. Might have just been perfect for me but it was just rock solid and as stated above could robin hood arrows very regularly. Sadly some scum bag family member stole it and traded it for a hand full of pills or something but that's another story.
     
  7. Jman

    Jman 8 pointer

    543
    0
    Feb 14, 2003
    I guess what I'm kind of looking for is some idea of the range of these bows. For example, if they're stated to be a 29" draw length, is that like other compounds in that the 29" is the maximum and that they can be adjusted down to 27"? Most older compounds have a 3" variance on the cam or wheel. With the Eagles having recurve limbs on the tip, I'm not sure what they are capable of. That connection at mid limb with the cables, braces, etc, is just an engineering marvel to me. Thus my interest in obtaining one. :)

    Additionally, I see them with weight ratings anywhere from 50 lbs, up to 80 lbs. I've heard that there were some 100 lb units but I've not seen one for sale. Again, if rated at 70lbs, can they dial down 10lbs +\- like most older compounds.

    Headofholler & Ribsplitter, can either one of you guys remember the specs on yours?

    Dxtsniper, thanks for your PM. I replied to it.
     
  8. headoftheholler

    headoftheholler 12 pointer

    3,177
    0
    Oct 16, 2007
    Getshot, KY
    This: http://www.oneidabows.net/forum/viewforum.php?f=43
    will answer most of your questions as to draw length change, bow pressing, owners manuals, ect. The guy that runs that forum stocks a
    ton of NOS parts for the older bows and is a wealth of knowledge on them. My eagle was 70 lbs 29" draw length. I would most likely still
    have the bow if I hunted in a more open enviroment. With the recurve limbs on those bows they are not too treestand friendly due to the overall
    length. One reason the Oneida bows are so popular with bowfishing is the ability to snap shoot it , i.e. you don't have to get back to full
    draw to release. A lot of Oneida shooters are finger shooters, I set mine up with a release.
     
  9. quackrstackr

    quackrstackr Welcome to Fantasy Island Staff Member

    24,084
    0
    Nov 19, 2003
    The Island
    One thing that I will warn you about on those bows... be extremely mindful of what you're doing on extreme down angle shots unless you like being kicked in the sack. There's a whole lot of movement that goes on with those limb tips.
     
  10. Jman

    Jman 8 pointer

    543
    0
    Feb 14, 2003
    Headholler,
    Thanks for the site. I'll check it out. Some of the prices I'm seeing on Ebay are amazing. Why is it that everytime I find some old something to get interested in, it turns out everybody else is too and the price is three times higher than what I thouight it would be???

    Quackstacker,
    Thanks for what might possibly be the most valuable archery tip I've ever received. Sure don't want a good kick'n below the equator :)
     
  11. philipfleek

    philipfleek 12 pointer

    10,310
    0
    Feb 24, 2008
    philville, KY
    Yes sir on that, Chase dang near knocked a hole in the duct work with the top limb on his.
    looks like someone hit it with a hammer.
     

Share This Page