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View Full Version : 4 Wheelers (ATV) legal on road?



Carl
12-29-2003, 05:21 PM
According to the way I read the law 4 wheelers are allowed on the road...Here is a link
http://www.kytc.state.ky.us/drvsmrt/atvlaws.htm
It says this:
A person may operate an all-terrain vehicle on any two (2) lane public highway in order to cross the highway. In crossing the highway under this paragraph, the operator must cross the highway at as close to a ninety (90) degree angle as is practical and safe, and cannot travel on the highway for more than two-tenths (2/10) of a mile.

(1) The Transportation Cabinet may designate, and a city or county government may designate, those public highways, segments of public highways, and adjoining rights-of-way of public highways under its jurisdiction where all-terrain vehicles that are prohibited may be operated.

(2) A person operating an all-terrain vehicle on a public highway under this subsection must possess a valid operator's license.

(3) A person operating an all-terrain vehicle on a public highway under this subsection must comply with all applicable traffic regulations.

(4) A person cannot operate an all-terrain vehicle under this subsection unless the all-terrain vehicle has at least one headlight and two taillights, which must be illuminated at all times the vehicle is in operation.

(5) A person operating an all-terrain vehicle under this subsection must restrict the operation to daylight hours, except when engaged in snow removal.

greenskeeter
12-30-2003, 09:30 AM
Most 4wheelers I've witnessed on 2 lane roads are usually traveling more than two-tenths of a mile.

ksp771
12-31-2003, 04:47 PM
Read the first sentence that I posted. As a Law Enforcement point of view each may view it differently. If your crossing the road that is fine but operating it to go to the store up the road is another.
KRS Kentucky revised statute.

An all-terrain vehicle cannot be operated on any public highway, roadway or right-of-way of any public highway or roadway.




An all-terrain vehicle cannot be operated on private property without the consent of the landowner, tenant, or individual responsible for the property.




An all-terrain vehicle cannot be operated on public property unless the governmental agency responsible for the property has approved the use of all-terrain vehicles.




Except for vehicles authorized to operate on a public highway, a person operating an all-terrain vehicle on public property must wear approved protective headgear, prescribed by the secretary of the Transportation Cabinet, at all times that the vehicle is in motion. The approved headgear requirement does not apply when the operator of any all-terrain vehicle is engaged in:

(1) Farm or agriculture related activities;
(2) Mining or mining exploration activities;
(3) Logging activities;
(4) Any other business, commercial, or industrial activity; or
(5) Use of that vehicle on private property.




A person under the age of sixteen (16) years must not operate an all-terrain vehicle with an engine size exceeding ninety (90) cubic centimeters displacement, and cannot operate an all-terrain vehicle unless under direct parental supervision.




A person under the age of twelve (12) years cannot operate an all-terrain vehicle with an engine size exceeding seventy (70) cubic centimeters displacement.



A person may operate an all-terrain vehicle on any two (2) lane public highway in order to cross the highway. In crossing the highway under this paragraph, the operator must cross the highway at as close to a ninety (90) degree angle as is practical and safe, and cannot travel on the highway for more than two-tenths (2/10) of a mile.
(1) The Transportation Cabinet may designate, and a city or county government may designate, those public highways, segments of public highways, and adjoining rights-of-way of public highways under its jurisdiction where all-terrain vehicles that are prohibited may be operated.
(2) A person operating an all-terrain vehicle on a public highway under this subsection must possess a valid operator's license.
(3) A person operating an all-terrain vehicle on a public highway under this subsection must comply with all applicable traffic regulations.
(4) A person cannot operate an all-terrain vehicle under this subsection unless the all-terrain vehicle has at least one headlight and two taillights, which must be illuminated at all times the vehicle is in operation.
(5) A person operating an all-terrain vehicle under this subsection must restrict the operation to daylight hours, except when engaged in snow removal.






http://www.wrightsweaponsystems.com

Big58cal
01-01-2004, 12:15 AM
Hey Carl, the way I read it, they're only allowed on the road to "cross" it, and that's it.

We used to have one of the Slow Moving Vehicle triangle plates on the back of ours (like a tractor has) and we used to operate it on the road, without cops doing anything about it. But the reason for this was that we usually had a disk, drag, or some other implement hooked up behind it when we did this also. In that aspect, it was a farm implement, essentially the same as a tractor.

broadside
01-01-2004, 06:52 AM
I like it this way because if they make it legal to ride on the road, then they will make you license them. Then you will have to pay taxes on them every year like you do your john boat now. Think of how much revenue that would generate.

CAIN'T HAVE NOTHIN

rlb165
01-01-2004, 09:05 AM
This is a link to a CJ article:

http://www.courier-journal.com/localnews/2002/07/29/ke072902s249670.htm


Here is an excerpt from that article:


""Two years ago, in an effort to address the dangers of ATVs on public roads, Kentucky implemented a law setting specific limits regarding onroad use. But critics say the law was too vague to be meaningful.

<b>Before the law, it was illegal to ride an ATV on two-lane roads.</b>

Under the new law, operators who have a driver's license can travel as much as two-tenths of a mile on roads ''in order to cross the highways.'' <b>The new law does not restrict ATV use on public roads by operators engaged in farm work, construction, road maintenance or snow removal.</b>

Police say the law is difficult to enforce because it's hard to determine how long an ATV rider has been on the highway.

Rep. Hubert Collins, D-Wittensville, fought against allowing ATVs on roads as head of the House Transportation Committee. ''I wanted to keep ATVs off public roads, but the law ended up so vague that they're on the highway all the time now,'' he said.

Rep. Johnnie L. Turner, R-Harlan, sponsored the ATV bill. He said he is concerned by the number of ATV accidents but believes banning them on public roads would be unfair.

''Don't try to take the rights away from the good majority that follow the law,'' Turner said. ''The knee-jerk reaction is to keep four-wheelers off the road, but that ain't gonna work.'' "

Not too long ago, I rode my 4-wheeler several miles to a friend's house, to spray Roundup on a patch of ground for foodplot prep. From reading articles like I posted, I thought I was perfectly legal in doing so, or I wouldn't have done it. But the stuff you guys are posting doesn't mention anything about how <b>"The new law does not restrict ATV use on public roads by operators engaged in farm work,...</b> etc".

Is the article wrong, or is there a more current law than you guys are referring to? (Or am I just overlooking something in your posts?)

ksp771
01-01-2004, 01:57 PM
For Ky law enformation please click on the department of criminal justice link listed below. You may call them directly to ask any questions regarding any law. This is the source of training and does not change with each individual. By calling them you will get your questions answered directly from the horses mouth.
http://docjt.jus.state.ky.us/Organization/

http://www.wrightsweaponsystems.com

Big58cal
01-02-2004, 01:42 AM
The way that I look at it, if you are performing "farm" work, then the 4-wheeler is no different than a tractor, back-hoe, log skidder, etc.

Let someone ticket me while I'm on the road with a disk or something behind the 4-wheeler! I guarantee that they will loose! The thing would have to be if you've got some kind of implement behind the 4-wheeler. If you've just got a hand-held sprayer or a bag of corn on the thing, I would say that you are S.O.L. as far as the law goes.